(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "ANNUAL REPORT - ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD (fiscal year ended March 31, 1989)"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportonta1989onta 






9 8 8 - 19 8 9 



ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD 

ANNUAL REPORT 




Ontario 



CONTENTS 



MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN 3 

INTRODUCTION 5 

STRUCTURE 10 

THE PUBLIC HEARING PROCESS 11 

REVIEW OF ACTIVITIES 13 
Selected Activities 15 
Ontario Hydro Review 16 
Natural Gas Rates Applications 17 
Facilities Applications 20 
Gas Storage Applications 22 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS 24 



The Ontario Energy Board is located at 
2300 Yonge Street 
Suite 2601 
Toronto, Ontario 
(416) 481-1967 

Copies of this and other Board publications may be purchased from the Ontario Government Book- 
store, 880 Bay Street, Toronto. Telephone (416) 326-5300. 

Out-of-town customers please contact the Ministry of Government Services, Publications 
Services Section, 5th Floor, 880 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario M7A 1N8. Toll-free long distance 
1-800-668-9938. 

ISSN 0317-4891 

Photographs of Board members, staff, and hearing courtesy of Peter O'Dell 

Photographs of natural gas installations courtesy of Union Gas Limited and of hydro installation 

courtesy of Ontario Hydro 




^ %s 



Energy/Energie 
Ontario 



nister/Ministre Ministry Minister Queen's Park 

n f ,-jpi Toronto, Ontario 

Ul UfcJ M7A2B7 

Energy I'Energie 416/965-4286 

Telex 0621 7880 



The Honourable Lincoln M. Alexander 
Lieutenant Governor of the 
Province of Ontario: 



I hereby submit the annual report of the Ontario 
Energy Board. It reviews the events and activities 
of the fiscal year 1988-89. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Lyn McLeod 
Minister of Energy 



ESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN 




Wy chowanec, Q.C. 
rirman 



left the Ontario Energy Board in December 1984 and returned to it as Chairman in July 
1988. The changes to the natural gas industry in Canada that took place during that short 
interval, and the effect of those changes on Ontario's gas distributors, their customers, and this 
Board were quite remarkable. 

The catalyst for change was the Western Accord and the Agreement on Natural Gas Markets 
and Prices, both signed in 1985, by which Canada and the producing provinces agreed to develop, 
along with the consuming provinces and the gas industry, a pricing system that would respond 
to the market. This system was to have been implemented within a year, but it was soon evident 
that a year was not long enough. 

Although hampered somewhat by legislation that has been virtually unchanged for a quarter 
of a century, this Board has worked in the years since 1985 to implement the two agreements. 
Through its many decisions it has encouraged the development of a natural gas market in which 
there were many buyers and many sellers. Despite the progress that has been made, however, the 
accord and the agreement have not yet been fully implemented. 

To date, deregulation, or more accurately re-regulation, has resulted in reduced prices to vir- 
tually all customers, but large industrial customers especially have had significant reductions. Sophis- 
ticated industrial users of gas were quick to buy directly from producers, but even smaller com- 
mercial customers are now either buying directly from Alberta or Saskatchewan producers or are 
taking advantage of other discount opportunities, where available. 

The new arrangements have raised many new issues for the Board to decide. During 1988-89, 
the Board reported to the Lieutenant Governor in Council on the issue of security of supply for 
Ontario customers. Among other things, the Board recommended that direct purchasers and partic- 
ularly local distributors should be encouraged to enter into the longest term contracts that can be 
justified on the basis of price and other business considerations. 

Towards the close of the fiscal year, the Board held separate hearings related to supply arrange- 
ments between Western Gas Marketing Limited and the three major Ontario gas distributors. The 
Board issued three separate decisions on April 14, 1989, approving rates that incorporated the gas 
cost resulting from these arrangements. The Board deferred making any decision regarding resale 
arrangements of system gas, which some intervenors alleged resulted in cross-subsidization by other 
ratepayers. There may be a generic hearing to review this matter, as well as several other related 
issues, later this year. 

With many of the major deregulation issues now resolved, it is time to examine in greater 
detail the continued impact of deregulation on the Ontario consumer. The Board may need to refine 
certain of its earlier decisions to ensure that just and reasonable rates are being paid for the supply 
of gas in this province. 

During the past year the Board's jurisdiction was challenged in the Supreme Court of Ontario 
in two cases, and in each case the Board's jurisdiction was confirmed. Also during the year the 
Board began preparing for the official implementation of the French Language Services Act and 
the Intervenor Funding Project Act. The Board now has four bilingual staff members who can 
provide services to the public in French. 

Under the Intervenor Funding Project Act, this Board was one of three chosen to participate 
in a three-year pilot project related to the provision of intervenor funding in a proceeding before 
the Board. During the year the Board drafted Rules of Practice and Procedure under this act, and 
these have been approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council. The first hearing to which this 
act applied was the reference on Ontario Hydro's bulk power rate proposal for 1990. 



Two other undertakings which began some time ago were successfully completed this year! 
The Board will soon issue the third edition of its Environmental Guidelines for Locating, Construct 
ing, and Operating Hydrocarbon Pipelines in Ontario. These guidelines will be published in Frencl 
as well. In addition a model franchise agreement was adopted by the utilities and the municipali 
ties in Ontario. The model agreement will be used in all future applications for natural gas franchise 
in a municipality. 

In summary, it has been a productive and challenging year for the Board, and I anticipati 
that the coming year will be equally so. 



/^rJns^/i^Ls&^-J a^^_ 



S.J. Wychowanec, Q.C. 
Chairman, Ontario Energy Board 








Board members on March 31, 1989, were, from left to right, C.A. Wolf Jr, H.E. Andrews, 
D.A. Dean, Vice-chairman ].C. Butler, Chairman S.J. Wychowanec, Q.C, M.A. Daub, 
R.M.R. Higgin, O.J. Cook; missing was M. O'Farrell. 



Ik 



TRODUCTION 



ntario relies heavily on natural gas as an energy source and as a feedstock, primarily in 
the production of chemicals. Natural gas is the major fuel for all sectors of the economy 
except transportation, and it is the primary fuel used in heating space and water in the province. 
Indeed Ontario uses more natural gas than any other consuming province and accounts for approxi- 
mately 41 percent of the total demand for Canadian natural gas. Natural gas provides approximately 
30 percent of the energy consumed in the province. Electricity provides about 18 percent of the 
energy consumed in Ontario, and its use is growing. Liquid fuels (oil and natural gas liquids), coal, 
and wood provide the balance of Ontario's energy consumption. 

The Ontario Energy Board regulates the natural gas industry through the setting of rates, author- 
izing the construction of transmission lines, and approval of franchise agreements. The Board also 
advises the Minister of Energy on general matters relating to the natural gas industry, as well as 
matters relating to Ontario Hydro. In all its considerations, the Board endeavours to ensure that 
rates are fair, that supply is secured, and that the public interest is upheld. 

The report that follows outlines the Board's mandate and its role and responsibilities in fulfill- 
ing that mandate. After a tabular listing of all the Board's activities over the past year, it discusses 
some of them briefly. 



MANDATE 

The Ontario Energy Board was formed in 1960 to provide an impartial formal mechanism for regu- 
lating specific aspects of Ontario's natural gas industry. In addition to its regulatory responsibilities, 
the Board, when requested in references from the Lieutenant Governor in Council, the Minister 
of Energy, or the Minister of Natural Resources, will advise on matters relating to energy, such 
as changes made by Ontario Hydro to its bulk power rates. In all its activities, the primary objec- 
tive of the Ontario Energy Board is to ensure that the public interest is served and protected. 

Most of the Board's responsibilities stem from legislation as set out primarily in the Ontario 
Energy Board Act. In addition, six other statutes give jurisdiction to the Board: 

• the Municipal Franchises Act; 

• the Petroleum Resources Act; 

• the Public Utilities Act; 

• the Assessment Act; 

• the Toronto District Heating Corporation Act; 

• the Intervenor Funding Project Act. 

The Intervenor Funding Project Act was proclaimed on April 1, 1989, by the Lieutenant 
Governor in Council. As a three-year pilot project, the act establishes a procedure to provide for 
advance funding to interveners in proceedings before a number of boards, including the Ontario 
Energy Board. It sets out specific criteria which the funding panel, established under the act, must 
consider in deciding whether to award funding to an intervenor. 



ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

SETTING RATES FOR NATURAL GAS 

Each natural gas utility sells and transports gas in franchised areas of the province. Competition 
now exists in the sale of energy: buyers may purchase gas directly from producers or they may 
turn to other sources of energy. Since the transportation of gas involves an extensive network of 
pipelines and storage facilities, a monopoly arrangement is most efficient; it avoids duplication 
and the cost increases that would result. 

In Ontario, rates for the sale of gas must be approved by the Board. Gas distributors are required 
by legislation to submit their proposed rates to the Board for review and approval, which usually 
takes place on an annual basis. Rates for each utility are set following a public hearing. A major 
rate hearing lasts approximately three to four weeks. 



A 




'AT ?s««&4Mb«*H Sk 

Three of the Board's bilin- 
gual staff: from left to right, 
Nicholas Belak, Francoise 
Lafond, and Peter O'Dell 



Rates vary among classes of customers: residential, commercial, and industrial. In setting rate: 
the Board's objective is to reflect the costs imposed on the system by the varying demands of differer 
classes of customers. Residential demand for natural gas as a heating fuel, for example, change 
according to the weather and the time of day. As a result, it costs more on a per unit basis t 
provide service to residential users than to industrial customers, which use relatively large amount 
of gas at a more constant level. 

In setting rates, the Board tries to strike a balance between the prices to be paid by customer 
and the rate of return which shareholders of the utilities are allowed to earn on their investment 
Rates are to be 'just and reasonable' for both customer and shareholder. In making its decisions 
the Board considers past, present, and projected expenses, along with current and forecast economi 
conditions and trends and the earnings expectations of the utility operators. 

The Board may grant interim rate relief to either the company or the customers in cases wher 
significant changes in a utility's costs or revenues have occurred or will occur. In such cases, ai 
interim rate hearing is held, which usually takes one or two days. Interim rates are subject to revisioi 
and are not final until the rates application is completed and the Board has issued its decision am 
order. 

As well as ensuring that utilities charge reasonable rates, the Board also must consider as par 
of the rate hearings the quality of service the utility provides. 

The Consumers' Gas Company Ltd is Canada's largest natural gas distribution utility. As o 
September 30, 1988, it served approximately 974,000 residential, commercial, and industrial cus 
tomers in south, central, and eastern Ontario. Through affiliated companies not regulated by th< 
Board, Consumers also supplies western Quebec and northern New York State. Consumers' rat< 
base was $1,416 billion at its year end, September 30, 1988. For that year Consumers had gas sale 
of 9.44 billion cubic metres, transportation volumes of 0.492 billion cubic metres, and revenue: 
of about $1.7 billion. 

Union Gas Limited is the second largest gas distributor in Ontario, serving customers in south 
western Ontario. It also operates a network of transmission pipeline, storage, and compressior 
facilities for customers and other utilities in eastern Ontario and Quebec. As of March 31, 1989 
Union's rate base was about $1,027 billion. It served over 573,000 residential, commercial, anc 
industrial customers, generating an estimated total system throughput of 14.7 billion cubic metre; 
for fiscal 1989, which includes gas transported to other gas distribution utilities. Total volume: 
of gas sales delivered to distribution customers (which includes both sales and transportation cus 
tomers) was 8.0 billion cubic metres. Total revenue for Union in its 1989 fiscal year was about 
$1.2 billion. 

ICG Utilities (Ontario) Ltd serves approximately 100 communities in northwestern, northern 
and eastern Ontario. Its natural gas distribution system comprises about 6,142 kilometres of pipeline 
originating at more than 76 delivery points on the TransCanada PipeLines (TCPL) transmissior 
system. The ICG system is composed of a series of laterals running off the TCPL system as it crosses 
Ontario, starting at Kenora and extending to Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence River. As ol 
December 31, 1988, ICG's average rate base was $395 million. Serving 168,000 customers, ICG's 
total throughput totalled 3.07 billion cubic metres, and transportation service totalled 230 millior 
cubic metres. ICG's total revenue was about $443 million. 

Natural Resource Gas Limited (NRG) is a small utility serving approximately 2,000 customers 
in the Aylmer area. As of September 30, 1988, NRG's rate base was $2.9 million. The company 
generated about $2.7 million in revenues in its 1988 fiscal year. 

Tecumseh Gas Storage Limited operates a gas storage pool in southwestern Ontario. The com 
pany generated about $15 million in revenues in its 1988 fiscal year. Consumers was Tecumseh's 
sole customer. 



k 



REVIEWING ONTARIO HYDRO RATES 

Ontario Hydro's bulk power rates (wholesale power rates for municipalities and certain industrial 
customers) are set by Hydro's own board of directors. However, Ontario Hydro is required to 
submit any proposed change in its rates to the Minister of Energy who then refers it to the OEB, 
along with full technical information and financial data. After a public hearing, which usually begins 
in late May or early June and runs for about four weeks, the Board submits a report with recom- 
mendations to the Minister of Energy on or before August 31 each year. The Board's role is an 
advisory one and its recommendations are not binding on Ontario Hydro. 

Ontario Hydro is the province's largest crown corporation. As of December 31, 1988, Ontario 
Hydro had assets of $34.36 billion. It served at that date over 3.46 million customers directly and 
indirectly, over 85 percent being residential. Provincial sales of 128,000 GWh and export sales of 
5,019 GWh produced revenue of $5.8 billion. 

REFERENCES AND GENERIC HEARINGS 

The Lieutenant Governor in Council, the Minister of Energy, or the Minister of Natural Resources 
may refer a matter to the Board for a public hearing and report. These references normally concern 
energy-related matters and generally attract widespread public interest. The Board's reports are 
advisory in nature. 

In addition, changes in ownership of utilities may be referred to the Board for a hearing and 
report. The leave of the Lieutenant Governor in Council is required when a utility wishes to sell 
its assets or amalgamate with another utility, and when any person wishes to acquire shares of 
a utility to the extent that more than 20 percent of any class of shares changes ownership. The 
Board may recommend exemption from a hearing or may hold a hearing and submit its report 
and recommendations to the Lieutenant Governor in Council. 

The Board may also hold generic hearings on its own initiative on matters under its jurisdic- 
tion. Such hearings are usually held in response to an emerging trend or an area of growing interest 
or concern, and deal with a subject in a broader context than issue-specific hearings. 




3 CONSUMERS' GAS 
mW lTl UNION GAS 



Natural Gas Distribution in Ontario 



A 



L 



APPROVAL OF FACILITIES 

Utilities wishing to construct a transmission line for natural gas in Ontario must obtain Board 
approval. In addition, all construction proposals are reviewed by the Ontario Pipeline Coordination 
Committee (OPCC), an interministerial committee concerned with the environmental and safety 
aspects of pipeline construction. The OPCC is chaired by a staff member of the OEB, and it includes 
representatives from the ministries of Agriculture and Food, Energy, Environment, Consumer and 
Commercial Relations, Natural Resources, Culture and Communications, Municipal Affairs, and 
Transportation. Other regional agencies, with whom the natural gas utilities consult in the early 
stages of their planning, are also represented as required. 

The OPCC tries to ensure that the construction of pipelines does not have any long-term 
negative effect on the environment and that the short-term impact during construction is minimized. 
With these objectives in mind, each proposal is reviewed, alternative routes or sites considered, 
and issues resolved before formal application for leave to construct is filed with the Board. 

When the utility applies to the Board for approval, the Board assesses whether the construc- 
tion is in the public interest, considering safety, economic feasibility, community benefits, security 
of supply, benefits for the utility, environmental impact, etc. The Ontario Energy Board has 
published Environmental Guidelines for Locating, Constructing, and Operating Hydrocarbon Pipe- 
lines in Ontario, which sets out its requirements. The Environmental Guidelines were developed 
in concert with provincial ministries and agencies whose mandates are affected by pipeline construc- 
tion. Under revision at present, the Environmental Guidelines incorporate the latest standards and 
mitigation practices of each of the ministries. They also provide for greater public participation 
in the planning process for pipeline construction. 

When a project is approved, the Board issues an order for leave to construct. The Board also 
grants the authority to expropriate land for transmission pipelines and related facilities and authorizes 
any pipeline crossings of highways, utility lines, and ditches. 

APPROVAL OF FRANCHISE AGREEMENTS 

Each municipality may grant to a gas utility the right to provide gas service and use road allowances 
in the municipality. A prerequisite to the essential by-law granting the franchise is the Board's 
approval of the terms and conditions of the franchise agreement. 

Many of the existing agreements date back thirty years and more. Because circumstances have 
changed substantially since the original agreement was made, the negotiation between the munici- 
pality and utility can be a lengthy and complex process. In 1985 the Municipal Franchise Committee 
was formed to develop a model franchise agreement which could be used as the basis for all new 
and renewed agreements. The model agreement came into effect in 1988 and sets out standard con- 
ditions for gas distribution, the use of road allowances, construction approvals, procedures for 
restoring lands after construction, etc. 

After the model agreement was implemented, municipal franchise renewals from Union, Con- 
sumers, and ICG, which were pending approval, were dealt with by the Board in three hearings, 
one for each company. In total, forty-nine franchise renewals were heard by the Board in the fall 
of 1988. Considerable time and expense was saved at the hearings because of the common nature 
of all the applications before the Board. The OEB expects that the model agreement will be the 
basis for all new and renewed franchise agreements. 

CERTIFICATES OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY 

No person is allowed to construct any works to supply gas without Board approval. The approval, 
in the form of a certificate, is not given unless public convenience and necessity appear to support 
approval. 

NATURAL GAS STORAGE 

Vital to the natural gas distribution system in Ontario is the ability to store gas, and gas storage 
pools therefore represent a natural resource of economic significance to the province. The main 
storage sites are depleted gas pools in southwestern Ontario. These storage pools are used by trans- 
mitters and distributors to meet fluctuating demand and to draw on in case of emergency. Gas 
is normally injected into storage during the summer months when demand is low, to be withdrawn 




With a capacity of 4100 megawatts, the Nanticoke generating station on Lake Erie, near Port Dover, 
is Ontario Hydro's largest coal-fired plant. 



in high-consumption periods during the winter. This balancing of load makes it possible for the 
transmission system from western Canada to operate efficiently. 

Gas may not be injected into any geological formation unless it is a designated gas storage 
area, described in Regulation 700, Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1980, under the OEB Act. In 
reviewing applications for the use of such areas, the Board considers the geology of the pool, its 
suitability, the appropriate boundary of the area to be designated, the applicants' rights to use the 
storage capacity, the need for it, and the economic viability of developing the storage pool. The 
Board recommends to the Lieutenant Governor in Council designated gas storage areas, authorizes 
their use, and, in cases where the applicants and landowners have not reached agreement, determines 
the compensation payable to landowners. 

Applications for drilling permits for wells within a designated gas storage area must be referred 
by the Ministry of Natural Resources, whose department issues the permits, to the Board for consid- 
eration. If the applicant is the authorized operator of the gas storage area, the Board has discretion 
as to how it should process the application before reporting to the minister. If the applicant is not 
the authorized operator, the Board must proceed by way of a public hearing. 

Applications to inject fluid and pressurize a geological formation also require a permit from 
the Ministry of Natural Resources. If the injection well is within 1.6 kilometres of a designated 
gas storage area, the minister is required by the Petroleum Resources Act to seek a report from 
the Board. 

The Board regulates the joining of the various interests within a spacing unit, field, or pool 
for the purpose of drilling or operating gas or oil wells, the designation of management, and the 
apportioning of the cost and benefits of such drilling or operation. 

OTHER MATTERS 

Natural gas utilities must conform to a uniform system of accounts as prescribed by the Board. 
No change in accounting methods may take place without the Board's approval. The Board is con- 
tinuing its first significant review and upgrading of the regulation which prescribes the classification 
of accounting since it was made under the OEB Act in 1966. 

The Board receives information regularly from natural gas utilities regarding financial opera- 
tions and performance. If a utility earns either too little or too much compared to its allowed rate 
of return, the Board's Energy Returns Officer and his or her staff may conduct a special investiga- 
tion. The Board may, on its own motion, require a utility to appear before it to explain its earnings. 

The nature of public utilities changes along with the economic and social environment in which 
they operate. Accordingly, it is appropriate for the Board to review legislation relating to public 
utilities and, if necessary, to propose amendments. 



A 



STRUCTURE 



ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AS OF MARCH 31, 1989 



ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD 





CHAIRMAN 






S I Wychowanec. Q C 


















SECRETARY TO THE 
CHAIRMAN 






1 E Byrnes 










r 




I 




1 














1 


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 
BOARD 




BOARD SOLICITOR 




BOARD SECRETARY 






VICE CHAIRMAN 




DIRECTOR TECHNICAL 
OPERATIONS 




ENERGY RETURNS 
OFFICER. 'DIRECTOR 

OF FINANCE 




A Maleszyk 


S A C Thomas 


I C Butler 


P Coroyannakis 


P A Drennen 


R A Cappadocia 


I 




I 




1 














1 




1 


SUPPORT SERVICES 




Assistant Board Solicitor 
S McWilliams 

Articling Student 
D Campbell 




Assistant Board Secretary 
P O'Dell 

Records Clerk 
C. Parkes 




BOARD MEMBERS 




SENIOR PROJECT 
MANAGERS 




DEPUTY ENERCY RETURNS 
OFFICER 


r 


D A Dean 
O.I Cook 
C A Wolf Jr 
R Higgin 
Vacanl (21 

PART-TIME MEMBERS 


K Chu 
M Connor 
G Daves 


E Mills 

A Powell 

Vacanl 

SPECIAL PROIECTS 
OFFICER 


N. Belak 

C Chaplin 

A. Meddows-Taylor 

P Vlahos 

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT 


E Pelersen-Traikov 
N Woodall 












Word Processing 
B Arsenijevic 




D Cochran 
PROIECT MANAGERS 


M A Daub 
M OFarrell 
H. Andrews 


S Llla 


Librarian 
L Buccilli 

Administrative Clerk 
D less 

Receptionist 
F Lafond 


R. Bell 
H Geller 
J. Girvan 

K Lill 
M McKay 
C Mackie 
A. Parekh 
M Roberts 

PROIECT COORDINATORS 

Vacant (21 
SYSTEMS COORDINATOR 

G Mayer 
RESEARCH ANALYST 




















T Meil 



few 



The Board employed 49 full-time staff in fiscal 1988-89. 



FINANCIAL STRUCTURE 



The Ontario Energy Board Act authorizes the Board to recover its costs by charging an appro- 
priate portion of these costs to the utilities involved in Board hearings and related activities. Following 
a hearing, the Board issues a cost order to the utility concerned. This represents payment towards 
costs incurred by the Board and also, when ordered, those incurred by the intervenors. The amount 
to be paid to the Board includes out-of-pocket and direct expenses attributable to a specific hearing, 
as well as a contribution towards the Board's fixed costs, including overhead and payroll. 

In fiscal 1988-89, the Board operated with an approved budget of $5.4 million. Of this amount, 
75 percent will be recovered by means of cost orders issued to utilities. 



IE PUBLIC HEARING PROCESS 




lublic hearings provide an essential mechanism with which the OEB can carry out its 
I mandate. Public hearings also provide a forum for groups or individuals, who may be 
affected by the Board's decisions, to express their concerns. Such public participation helps to ensure 
that the Board, in reaching a decision, will be informed and will consider a wide variety of views 
and interests. The hearing process includes eleven steps. 

1 INITIATION 

The hearing process begins: 

• upon receipt of an application; or 

• upon receipt of a reference from the Lieutenant Governor in Council, the Minister of Energy, 
or the Minister of Natural Resources; or 

• upon notice from the Board that it will initiate proceedings to consider a matter under its 
jurisdiction. 

2 NOTICE OF APPLICATION 

Applicants are required to serve the Board's notice of the application on all affected parties and 
interested public groups. If the Board itself has initiated a hearing, it will serve the notice. For a 
major rate case, a natural gas utility usually will publish notices of its application in regional daily 
newspapers. 

When an application affects people residing in certain government-designated areas, all notices 
also must be published in French in French-language newspapers. A notice must appear in a French 
weekly newspaper if no French daily newspaper is published in the area. 

3 INTERVENTIONS 

Interested groups or individuals wishing to participate in the hearing are referred to as 'intervenors.' 
To ensure their eligibility to participate in the hearing, they must file an intervention, which explains 
their reasons for wishing to take part. 

In 1988-89 participants could request costs for their participation at the conclusion of the hearing. 
On April 1, 1989, the Intervenor Funding Project Act came into effect. It establishes a procedure 
that allows intervenors to apply for advanced funding before the hearing begins. A funding panel 
appointed by the Board decides on the eligibility of applicants for intervenor funding and the amount 
of each award. Participants may continue to ask for costs at the conclusion of the hearing as before. 

4 NOTICE OF HEARING 

Once the Board has determined the scope and probable length of the hearing, it directs the applicant 
to serve notice of the time and place of the hearing on all parties who have intervened. 




The public hearing to review Ontario Hydro's proposal to change its rates 




Board Member Orville Cook 
preparing a Board Decision 



5 PRE-HEARING DOCUMENTATION 

To allow sufficient time for all parties to review information pertaining to the application, the appli 
cant must file evidence in support of its application two to three months before the hearing begins 
Board staff and intervening parties may also seek additional information by way of written inter 
rogatories. These interrogatories are answered by the utility before the hearing commences. 

In the case of applications for the construction of pipelines, which are reviewed by the Ontario 
Pipeline Coordination Committee, the normal requirements of pre-filed evidence would include 
route selection and environmental impact studies. 

6 PROCEDURAL ORDERS 

The Board may issue procedural orders specific to the case. Such orders may set the date for el 
hearing, for example, or contain deadline dates for completing certain procedural matters sucK 
as the filing of supporting evidence, interrogatories, and answers thereto. Procedural orders may 
also set forth a list of the issues to be dealt with at the hearings. 

7 'FIRST DAY' PROCEEDINGS 

Before the hearing of evidence commences, the Board panel may review procedural matters, tech- 
nical issues, and the general approach to the hearing. This gives everyone an opportunity to become 
familiar with the application and to identify all the issues they wish to address in the hearing. 

8 THE HEARING 

The Board ensures that sufficient evidence is presented, tested, and put on the record, so that an 
informed decision can be made. The applicant usually testifies first, through written evidence and 
witnesses. Intervenors and counsel to Board staff then question these witnesses, and may offer 
witnesses of their own. These witnesses may be cross-examined by the applicant or by the other 
intervenors. When all evidence has been given, each party may offer a summation in the form 
of written or oral argument as directed by the Board. 

The pre-filed evidence, arguments, and transcripts of the hearing are a matter of public record 
and are available at the Board office in Toronto. 

9 BOARD DECISIONS/REPORTS 

Depending on whether the hearing was a result of a reference, or either an application or a notice 
from the Board, the Board summarizes its deliberations in a document referred to as a 'Report,' i 
or a 'Decision with Reasons.' These documents discuss all the issues and arguments raised in the 
hearing and contain the Board's recommendations or findings. Depending on the complexity of 
the case, the document will appear a few weeks or months after a hearing. Copies of the document 
are available from the Ontario Government Bookstore, 800 Bay Street, Toronto, upon payment 
of a modest prescribed fee. Persons involved in the hearing receive copies of the document from 
the Board. 

The Board's recommendations are not binding in most cases referred to it by the Lieutenant 
Governor in Council, the Minister of Energy, or the Minister of Natural Resources. The appro- 
priate minister or the Lieutenant Governor in Council decides whether or not the recommenda- 
tions should be implemented. In the case of references from the Minister of Natural Resources with 
respect to drilling permits, however, the recommendations are binding upon the minister. 

10 BOARD ORDER 

A Board Order is a legal document which directs the implementation of a Board Decision and is 
binding on the parties named. 

11 REVIEW AND APPEAL 

A Decision or Order of the Board may be appealed by: 

• applying to the Board requesting that it rescind or vary its Order; 

• petitioning the Lieutenant Governor in Council; 

• appealing an Order to the Divisional Court upon a question of law or jurisdiction; 

• applying to the Divisional Court for judicial review of a Board Decision. 






k 



iVIEW OF ACTIVITIES 

Ontario Energy Board, 



Summary of Activities, April 1, 1988— March 31, 1989 



FILE NUMBER 



APPLICANT/ORIGINATOR CASE DESCRIPTION 



Natural Gas Rates Applications 

EBRO 411-III-A/430II-A Falconbridge 

EBRO 440-2 ICG 

EBRO 451-1 NRG 

EBRO 452 Consumers 

EBRO 452-3 Consumers 

EBRO 455-1 Tecumseh 

EBRO 456 Union 

EBRO 456-4 Union 



Clarification/rehearing of ICG rate matter 
Recovery of gas costs relating to WGML contract 
Interim recovery of deferred gas costs 

1988 & 1989 fiscal year adjustment of rate levels and design 
Recovery of gas costs relating to WGML contract 

Interim recovery of costs relating to investment in Dow-Moore pool 

1989 & 1990 fiscal year adjustment to rate level and design 
Recovery of gas costs relating to WGML contracts 



Reference from the Minister of Energy regarding Ontario Hydro 
HR 17 Ministry of Energy Rates 1989 



Reference from Lieutenant Governor in Council 
EBRLG 30A/B Consumers 

EBRLG 32 OEB 



Undertakings 
Security of Supply 



Pipeline Construction and Expropriation 



EBLO 223 

EBLO 224 

EBLO 225 

EBLO 226 

EBLO 226A 

EBLO 227 

EBLO 228 

EBLO 229 

EBLO 230 



Consumers 

Tecumseh 

Consumers 

Union 

TCPL 

Union 

ICG 

ICG 

Union 



Rugby Gate station and Georgian Bay reinforcement pipeline 

Development of Dow-Moore pool storage and pipeline construction 

Leave to construct Peterborough/Lindsay pipeline 

St Clair pipeline 

Jurisdiction regarding St Clair pipeline 

Dawn 156 storage pipeline 

Horseshoe Valley pipeline 

Prices Corners pipeline 

Strathroy & Beachville facilities expansion 



Pipeline Exemp 


tions 




PL 


63 




Union 


PL 


64 




Union 


PL 


65 




Union 


PL 


66 




Union 


PL 


67 




Union 


PL 


68 




Union 


PL 


69 




ICG 


Other Ontario 


Energy Board Orders 


EBO 


147 




Tecumseh 


EBO 


149 




Union 


EBO 


150 




Union 


EBO 


154 




Union 


EBO 


155 




Union 


EBO 


156 




Tecumseh 


EBO 


158 




Union 



Village of Burford pipeline 

Towerline Road pipeline (Norwich and Burford townships) 

Towerline Road pipeline (Burford Township) 

Caradoc Township pipeline 

Sombra storage pipeline (County of Lambton) 

Enniskillen gas storage pipeline 

Northland Power-Cochrane cogeneration plant pipeline 



Designation of Dow-Moore pool 
Storage/transportation contract for Kingston PUC 
Storage/transportation contract for Consumers 
Storage agreement for Tarpon Gas Marketing 
Contract carriage application for C-I-L 
Storage contract for Consumers 
Storage/transportation agreement for Domtar 



A 



FILE NUMBER 



APPLICANT/ORIGINATOR CASE DESCRIPTION 



Franch 


ise Approval 




EBA 


405/472 


Union 


EBA 


470 


Consumers 


EBA 


473 


Consumers 


EBA 


474 


Consumers 


EBA 


475 


Consumers 


EBA 


476 


Consumers 


EBA 


477 


Consumers 


EBA 


479 


Consumers 


EBA 


488 


Consumers 


EBA 


489 


Consumers 


EBA 


490 


ICG 


EBA 


491 


ICG 


EBA 


494 


Consumers 


EBA 


495 


Consumers 


EBA 


496 


Consumers 


EBA 


498 


ICG 


EBA 


499 


ICG 


EBA 


500 


ICG 


EBA 


501 


ICG 


EBA 


502 


Consumers 


EBA 


503 


ICG 


EBA 


504 


Union 


EBA 


505 


Union 


EBA 


506 


Union 


EBA 


507 


Union 


EBA 


508 


Union 


EBA 


509 


Union 


EBA 


510 


Union 


EBA 


511 


Union 


EBA 


512 


Union 


EBA 


513 


Union 


EBA 


514 


Union 


EBA 


515 


Union 


EBA 


516 


Union 


EBA 


517 


Union 


EBA 


518 


Union 


EBA 


519 


Union 


EBA 


520 


Union 


EBA 


521 


Union 


EBA 


522 


Union 


EBA 


523 


Union 


EBA 


524 


Union 


EBA 


525 


Union 


EBA 


526 


Union 


EBA 


527 


Union 


EBA 


528 


Union 


EBA 


529 


Union 



Town of Blenheim 

County of Victoria 

Town of Shelburne 

Town of Caledon 

Town of Innisfil 

Township of Amaranth 

Town of Whitby 

Township of Mulmur 

Township of Melancthon 

Township of Cavan 

City of Sault Ste Marie 

Township of Augusta 

Township of Hope 

Township of Hamilton 

Township of South Monaghan 

Township of Hamilton 

Township of Osnabruck 

Township of North Fredericksburgh 

Township of Kingston 

Township of Seymor 

Township of Medonte 

County of Kent 

City of Chatham 

Town of Dresden 

Town of Tilbury 

Village of Erie Beach 

Village of Highgate 

Village of Wheatley 

Village of Wyoming 

Township of Adelaide 

Township of Camden 

Township of Chatham 

Township of Dover 

Township of Harwich 

Township of Howard 

Township of Orford 

Township of Raleigh 

Township of Romney 

Township of Tilbury East 

Township of Zone 

Town of Forest 

Town of Parkhill 

Village of Arkona 

Village of Ailsa Craig 

Village of Thedford 

Township of Bosanquet 

Township of East Williams 






k 



FILE NUMBER 



APPLICANT/ORIGINATOR CASE DESCRIPTION 



EBA 530 
EBA 531 
EBA . 532 



Union 
Union 
Consumers 



Township of West Williams 
County of Lambton 
Village of Port McNicholl 



Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity 

EBC 139B ICG 

EBC 182 Consumers 

EBC 183 Consumers 

EBC 184 Consumers 

EBC 185 Consumers 

EBC 186 Consumers 

EBC 187 ICG 



Township of Oro 
Village of Coldwater 
Township of Medonte 
Township of Hope 
Township of Hamilton 
Township of South Monaghan 
Township of Medonte 



Uniform Accounting Orders 
U4 076 ICG 



Deferral of costs relating to certain hearings 



Reports to Minister of Natural Resources 



EBRM 89 

EBRM 90 

EBRM 91 

EBRM 92 



Tecumseh 
Tecumseh 
Union 
Tecumseh 



Drilling permit for Dow-Moore pool 
Drilling permit for Kimball-Colinville pool 
Drilling permit for Dawn 156 pool 
Drilling permit for Kimball-Colinville pool 




an Thomas, Board Secre- 
ry, processing an applica- 
m received by the OEB 



SELECTED ACTIVITIES 

SECURITY OF SUPPLY HEARING EBRLG 32 

Following a reference from the Lieutenant Governor in Council, dated May 19, 1988, the Board 
held a hearing to investigate a number of issues pertaining to the current and future supply needs 
of gas users in Ontario. Participants in the fourteen-day hearing included representatives from all 
sectors of the gas industry: producer, broker, transporter, distributor, and end-user. The Board 
issued its interim report in August 1988 and its final report in November. The report included the 
following recommendations: 

• the government should encourage prudent investment to increase storage capacity; 

• the Board should review periodically gas supply and related concerns; 

• the government should publish guidelines to enhance the public's understanding of contracting 
practices; 

• long-term contracts should be encouraged without the imposition of mandatory terms or 
standards; 

• direct purchase and buy/sell customer transportation arrangements, except with Board exemp- 
tion, should be for three years; 

• policies to make excess transportation capacity available to other Ontario distributors or direct 
purchase customers should be developed; 

• the 'core market' should not be defined, and no limitation should be imposed on any customer 
as to the choice of supplier; 

• the government should investigate whether a strategic reserve of gas to be used during intervals 
of supply shortage should be established for Ontario. 



A 



k 



COST OF GAS HEARINGS EBRO 440-2, 452-3, 456-4 

On January 22, 1988, as reported in last year's Annual Report, the Board issued three simultaneou 
Decisions relating to Ontario's three major gas utilities, Consumers, ICG, and Union, wherein i 
accepted the renegotiated agreements of the three companies with Western Gas Marketing Limitec 
(WGML) for one more year, to October 31, 1988, to allow extra time for the development of ; 
more competitive market. 

The three companies applied to the Board in August and October 1988 for approval for rate 
making purposes of the cost of gas supplies flowing from contracts each had recently negotiatec 
with WGML. The three sales contracts are similar in structure: gas supplies are sold in two blocks 
both supplied at $2.20 per gigajoule, but with Block A designed for the 'essential customer group, 
negotiated for a longer period of time (fifteen and twelve years), and with a fixed $0.60 per gigajouh 
demand charge included in the price for the term of the contract. Block B, the smaller volume 
is negotiated for a shorter period of time (five or three years) and is destined for large volume users 

The Board held hearings in February and March 1989 and issued three Decisions, dated April 14 
1989, accepting the cost of gas flowing from the WGML contracts for rate-making purposes. Tht 
specifics for each company are discussed below. 






ONTARIO HYDRO REVIEW 

BULK POWER RATES PROPOSAL HR 17 

Ontario Hydro's proposal to increase its rates effective January 1, 1989, was referred to the Board 
by the Minister of Energy on April 19, 1988. Hydro proposed an average all-customer rate increase 
of 5.5 percent, based on a revenue requirement of $5,942 million which represented an increase 
of $495 million over 1988 revenue. 

In its Report, the Board recommended an average all-customer rate increase of 5.8 percent. 
The Board also recommended the payment of a $25 million debt guarantee fee to the provincial 
government. The Board's Report included forty-six recommendations to the Minister of Energy. 
The Board also expressed concern about the lack of time in the hearing process to review the issues 
adequately; the degree of control exercised over Hydro's operating, maintenance, and administra- 
tion costs; and the appropriate allocation of Hydro's demand management funds. 




Otto Holden generating station, a 243 megawatt plant on the Ottawa River, has provided power 
to Hydro customers since the 1950s. 



NATURAL GAS RATES APPLICATIONS 

CONSUMERS 

Main Rates Application EBRO 452 

On March 28, 1988, Consumers applied to the Board for an increase in rates for its 1989 fiscal 

year commencing October 1, 1988, as a result of a forecasted gross revenue deficiency of $9.7 million. 

This revenue deficiency was later amended to a revenue sufficiency of $17.2 million, based on a 

14.375 percent return on equity and a 35 percent equity ratio. The hearing began July 20, 1988, 

and continued for eighteen days. It recommenced September 6 and was completed September 20. 

The second phase dealt mainly with the cost allocation and rate design matters. 

During the hearing the Board ordered a rate reduction of 0.1433 cents per cubic metre effective 
July 19, 1988, because of Consumers' projected excess revenue of $13.7 million in fiscal 1988. In 
its Decision with Reasons, dated December 21, 1988, the Board found a gross revenue sufficiency 
of $36.2 million for the 1989 fiscal year, based on a 13.5 percent return on equity and a 35 percent 
common equity ratio. On January 12, 1989, the Board issued an addendum to its Decision which 
adjusted gas costs to reflect certain costs associated with buy/sell purchases. This addendum increased 
the gross revenue sufficiency for the 1989 fiscal year to $38.3 million. 

On January 18, 1989, Consumers filed a section 30 application for review and variation of 
certain portions of the December 21, 1988, Decision. The company submitted that it would be 
unable to earn its allowed return on equity if the Board continued to impose a limit on the rate 
of return allowed on certain customer rates. In its Decision, dated February 6, 1989, the Board 
reiterated its belief that rates should become more cost based but allowed the company to approach 
this objective gradually. The Board established a deferral account for any resulting revenue shortfall. 

Main Rates Application — Consumers 



Requested 



Allowed 



$ million 



Rate base 
Utility income 
Gross revenue excess 



1516.5 

199.4 

17.2 



1500.9 

203.3 

38.3 



percentage 



Indicated rate of return 
Required rate of return 
Common equity ratio 
Return on common equity 



13.15 
12.52 
35.00 
14.375 



13.54 
12.06 
35.00 
13.50 



Undertakings EBRLG 30 A/ B 

On February 3, 1988, Consumers applied for approval of debt financing for its subsidiary Gazifere 
Inc. and approval to continue investing in Arbor Living Centres Inc. through Congas Holdings, 
another subsidiary. These applications were pursuant to undertakings given to the Lieutenant Gover- 
nor in Council by the company on March 4, 1987. The hearing convened on May 3, 1988, and 
oral argument was heard the following day. 

In its Decision of June 30, 1988, the Board noted that the application raised issues regarding 
the type and magnitude of the diversification that should be permitted in the utility operating com- 
pany and the tests that should be applied to judge the prudent limits for such investments. The 
Board indicated that the current level of investment could continue, subject to certain conditions 
of approval. However, the Board directed Consumers not to increase its investment or participation 
in Arbor directly, through Congas, or through any other subsidiary, beyond the currently approved 
level of $21 million in equity and $80 million in associated debt issued by Arbor. 



A 




2- 

Trenching in preparation for laying the NPS 42 pipeline approved by the Board (EBLO 230) 



The Board approved the proposed subsidiary financing for Gazifere subject to certain terms 
and conditions. However, the Board noted that debt issued by non-regulated subsidiaries should 
always remain a minor component of the non-current investments made by the utility. The Board's 
Decision regarding these matters is currently under appeal before the Board. 

Cost of Gas EBRO 452-3 

By letter of agreement dated October 12, 1988 (amended December 12), Consumers and WGML 
established the terms and conditions for new, unbundled gas sales contracts. In addition, Consumers 
entered into a separate transportation contract with TCPL. By notice of motion dated October 19, 
1988, Consumers asked the Board to approve, for rate-making purposes, the cost of gas flowing 
from this contract for the first and second contract years. The effective date of the agreement was 
January 1, 1989, as long as Board approval was received by April 20, 1989. In addition, the Board 
was asked to approve the costs of gas resulting from contracts the company had entered into for 
winter-peaking and other long-term gas supplies. 

As discussed earlier in the section on cost of gas, the WGML gas sales contract is divided into 
two blocks of gas at a specified price for the first two years. In Consumers' contract, Block A is 
for 150 billion cubic feet for fifteen years, and Block B for 38 billion cubic feet for five years, renew- 
able on an annual basis thereafter. In the third and following years of the contract, the price of 
gas for the two blocks will be negotiated by the two parties. The contracts allow for volume reduc- 
tions to both blocks of gas should Consumers' customers arrange to purchase directly from pro- 
ducers. WGML and Consumers also agreed to share provisions for excess transportation capacity 
Consumers may have on the TCPL system. 

The hearing began on February 6, 1989, and concluded with the filing of Consumers' Reply 
Argument on March 13. The Board's Decision, dated April 14, 1989, accepted the cost of gas flowing 
from the first two years of the WGML contract and other gas supply contracts for rate-making 
purposes. 

ICG 

Review by Board 

ICG did not apply to the Board to adjust rates for its 1989 fiscal year. The Board's Energy Returns 
Officer reviewed the relevant financial data and recommended that ICG be exempted from a public 
rate review. 




oard Solicitor Anna 
\-a\eszyk providing a legal 

'view 



Cost of Gas EBRO 440-2 

ICG's new supply and transportation agreement with TCPL and WGML, executed October 11, 
1988, and effective January 1, 1989, is composed of a gas sales contract and transportation operating 
agreement with WGML and transportation contracts with TCPL for the various delivery areas on 
the ICG system. ICG's agreement provided for fifteen-year and five-year blocks of gas. This agree- 
ment replaced ICG's contract demand service contracts with TCPL. ICG's existing pricing agreement 
had expired on October 31, 1988. ICG purchased gas from WGML/TCPL between November 1 
and December 31, 1988, pursuant to its 1986 agreement and 1987 amendment, with the CD contracts 
remaining in effect for this period. 

The Board's Decision, dated April 14, 1989, accepted the cost of gas flowing from the WGML 
contract for the first two years for rate-making purposes. 

Application to Reopen ICG Phase II Proceedings by Falconbridge Limited EBRO 411-IIIA, 430-IIA 
Falconbridge, an ICG industrial customer, applied to the Board on June 17, 1988, for clarification, 
rehearing, or review of the Board's Decision of May 20, 1988, dealing with cost allocation and 
rate design matters for ICG. In its application, Falconbridge requested that retroactive adjustments 
commencing February 20, 1987, be made on a class-average rather than a customer-specific basis 
under the new demand-commodity rate structure for ICG's large industrial customers. 

The Board in its Decision, dated September 20, 1988, being better informed of the serious finan- 
cial consequences faced by certain customers in the implementation of the new demand-commodity 
rate structure, particularly for low load factor customers, found that the effective date of ICG's 
new rate structure should be January 1, 1988, and that these customers' bills should be adjusted 
retroactively for the February 20 to December 31, 1987, period on a class-average basis. 

NRG 

Interim Rate Relief EBRO 451-1 

By a letter dated October 19, 1988, NRG requested interim rate relief to recover an accumulated 
deficit in a deferral account which the Board had established to track variances between the fore- 
cast and the actual cost of gas. In its interim Decision, dated March 22, 1989, the Board allowed 
NRG to record $134,745 in the account as of September 30, 1988. The Board further indicated 
that interest relating to these costs should also be recorded. Interim rate relief was denied, however, 
because the company had not provided sufficient evidence that these amounts should be recovered 
in rates. The company was directed to submit further evidence for their contention in its next main 
rates case. 

UNION 

Main Rates Application EBRO 456 

On August 31, 1988, Union applied to the Board for a rate increase for its 1990 fiscal year based 

on a projected deficiency of $32,065 million in revenue. This projected deficiency was later amended 

to $16,546 million reflecting the impact of federal tax reform and Union's updated forecast based 

on second quarter results for fiscal 1989. The deficiency was based on a request for 14.875 percent 

rate of return on common equity and a 29 percent equity ratio. 

On its own motion, the Board held a limited issues review of Union's 1989 fiscal year which 
examined the appropriate rate of return on common equity, long- and short-term debt, and preferred 
shares, the rate base, storage and transportation revenue, unaccounted-for gas volumes, through- 
put forecasts, and labour costs. This review began on November 7, 1988, and lasted a total of 
nine days. In its Decision, issued March 20, 1988, the Board found a rate base of $1,026 billion, 
an allowed rate of return of 11.9 percent, and a total revenue excess of $24,687 million. The Board 
directed Union to rebate $10.1 million to its customers, as a result of projected tax reform savings. 
It also directed Union to reduce its rates, effective November 1, 1988, to reflect the Board's findings 
that Union's current rates would result in excess revenues of $14,587 million on an annualized basis, 
excluding tax reform. The Board's findings were primarily based on adjustments to Union's through- 
put forecasts and a finding of 13.75 percent for rate of return on common equity. 



A 




Energy Returns Officer 
Nicholas Belak reviewing 
technical data filed by the 
utilities 



The hearing of evidence on Union's application for a rate increase for 1990 began on January 
1989, and was adjourned January 20. The portion of the proceeding dealing with rate design ah 
cost allocation was deferred until April 1989 to allow the Board time to consider the renegotiate 
gas cost agreements between Union and WGML. The Board's overall decision regarding Union 
1990 test year application was still pending at the end of the Board's fiscal year. 

Cost of Gas EBRO 456-4 
On August 31, 1988, Union Gas applied to the Board for an order fixing just and reasonable rate 
for the sale, storage, and transmission of gas. It also applied for an order to reflect in rates tfc 
gas costs flowing from gas purchasing agreements with TCPL and WGML for the delivery perio 
beginning November 1, 1988. On November 25, 1988, Union and WGML reached an agreemer 
in principle on new long-term gas supply arrangements to commence February 1, 1989, and interir 
pricing arrangements for the period November 1, 1988, to January 31, 1989. In January 1989, WGM 
and Union signed the new gas supply contract. 

In these new agreements the old contracts were unbundled into separate supply and transpoi 
tation components. Union's gas sales supply arrangement with WGML is structured in two block? 
Block A for a twelve-year and Block B for a three-year period. The total volume to be taken ou 
of this contract in 1989 is 104 billion cubic feet. Volumes of Block B gas supplies are those take: 
by Union's customers who hold SGR arrangements with WGML. The agreement provides for 
10 percent decontracting of fuel gas volumes to October 31, 1989, and the right to decontract furthe 
volumes in the following year. 

Unlike the other Ontario distributors, Union has not entered into a long-term transportation 
contract with TCPL. The gas supply contract includes a provision that allows for the sharing o 
any excess capacity Union may have on the TCPL system. The hearing was held between March '. 
and 17, with final argument on April 4. 

The Board's Decision, dated April 14, 1989, accepted the cost of gas pursuant to the WGM1 
contract for the first two years and other gas supply contracts for rate-making purposes. 



FACILITIES APPLICATIONS 

CONSUMERS 



Rugby Gate Station and Georgian Bay Reinforcement Pipeline 

EBLO 223; EBC 182, 183; EBA 492, 493 

The Board, in its Decision of June 8, 1988, approved Consumers' application to construct 48 kilo 
metres of NPS 8 pipeline in Simcoe County to reinforce the existing gas supply to the Midlanc 
area, which was at capacity. The Board found that the new pipeline would increase security ol 
supply to customers in the Georgian Bay area. In conjunction with its application, Consumers alsc 
applied to the Board for certificates of public convenience and necessity and for municipal fran- 
chise approvals for the village of Coldwater and the township of Medonte, areas that could be 
serviced by Consumers' new pipeline. The Board approved these applications. 

Peterborough-Lindsay Reinforcement Pipeline 

EBLO 225 (PL 62); EBC 184, 185, 186; EBA 494, 495, 496 

On May 26, 1988, the Board heard Consumers' applications for leave to construct 31 kilometres 
of NPS 12 pipeline through the townships of Hope and Cavan. Consumers maintained that the 
pipeline would reinforce its existing system serving the Peterborough area, establish a second source 
of supply to this market, and provide service to customers along the route. Also heard were appli- 
cations by Consumers to supply and distribute gas in the townships of Hope, Hamilton, and South 
Monaghan, which could be served from the proposed pipeline. 

The Board's Decision, issued July 22, 1988, approving the pipeline construction, found that 
the pipeline was needed to assure a reasonable and safe supply to the Peterborough and Lindsay 
areas. Consumers' applications to serve Hope and Hamilton townships were not approved because 
the Board considered that these townships were adequately served by ICG under existing franchises 
and certificates. 



Blk. 



ICG 

Horseshoe Valley EBLO 228; EBC 187, 139-B; EBA 503 

ICG applied for leave to construct approximately 8.5 kilometres of NPS 4 and NPS 2 pipeline to 

serve new customers in the Horseshoe Valley area in Oro and Medonte townships. Consumers 

intervened in this hearing and submitted that it should be given the opportunity to investigate the 

merits of constructing a pipeline to the Horseshoe Valley area. 

The Board, in its Decision dated October 20, 1988, reserved judgment on ICG's application 
pending information on projected residential development in the area. The Board also encouraged 
both ICG and Consumers to jointly consider constructing a line from Consumers' existing system. 

Prices Corners EBLO 229 

ICG applied to the Board for leave to construct 2.2 kilometres of NPS 4 pipeline in Simcoe County 
to serve the community of Prices Corners, located in the townships of Oro and Medonte. Consumers, 
which holds the rights to distribute natural gas in Oro and Medonte, intervened in the hearing 
and reaffirmed its plans to provide service to Prices Corners. The Board denied ICG's applications 
in its Decision of October 20, 1988. 




Automatic welding machines used in the construction of the NPS 42 pipeline approved by the Board 
(EBLO 230) 



UNION 

St Clair Pipeline EBLO 226/ 226 A 

Union applied for leave to construct 11.7 kilometres of an NPS 24 pipeline from the proposed 
St Clair valve site to the proposed Sarnia industrial line station in Moore Township and continuing 
to Bickford Pool compressor station in Sombra Township. Evidence was heard between June 16 
and 20, 1988, with oral arguments on June 24. Later TCPL requested that it be allowed to file addi- 
tional evidence which it considered relevant to the issue of whether or not the OEB had jurisdiction 
to decide on a pipeline that will be directly linked to the movement of gas across an international 
border. The reopened hearing was convened on August 16, 1988. 

In its Decision, dated September 1, 1988, the Board found that the proposed facilities were 
in the public interest. Specifically, they would increase access to the broader U.S. gas reserve base 
and provide transportation alternatives; enhance security of gas supply through diversification of 
sources; supplement developed storage in Ontario by giving access to Michigan storage space and 
permit the integration of the two storage systems; and, through increased ability to access and 
store U.S. gas bought at spot and firm prices, enhance the bargaining power of Union and its storage 
and transportation customers when negotiating the price of primary supplies of western Canadian 
gas. 



A 







Katy Chu providing secre- 
tarial services for the prepa- 
ration of an OEB Decision 



The Board found that the proposed pipeline was within its jurisdiction and dismissed TCPL' 
motion on this matter. Leave to construct the proposed facilities was granted to Union subject t 
conditions. TCPL appealed the Board's Decision on the grounds that only the National Energ; 
Board has jurisdiction in such a situation. The Divisional Court upheld the OEB Decision. 

Dawn 156 Storage Pipeline EBLO 227 

By letter dated June 6, 1988, Mr Ken McGregor complained to the Board about Union's construe 
tion of a NPS 30 pipeline across the McGregor property in Dawn Township. Union replied tha 
the pipeline construction was necessary so that the pool, underlying the McGregor property, couli 
store an additional 3.8 billion cubic feet of gas. Union claimed that the line in question was a gatherinj 
not a transmission line, and that it had the right to enter upon these lands which were within th< 
designated gas storage area without authorization of the Board. 

The Board issued a Procedural Order, dated June 30, 1988, directing Union to cease construe 
tion immediately and appear before the Board on July 6. Following its review, the Board issuec 
an interim decision concluding that the pipeline was a transmission line and notified all parties 
that it would hear evidence concerning this matter. In its Decision, dated August 15, 1988, th< 
Board found that the pipeline was necessary to meet the storage requirements of both Union anc 
its storage customers. The Board lifted its stop-work order and granted Union an exemption tc 
construct the transmission line. 

Union sought leave to appeal the Board's Decision before the Ontario Divisional Court or 
the grounds that Union has the right to construct pipelines within a designated gas storage area, 
without further leave of the Board. This application for leave to appeal was denied, thus affirming 
the Board's jurisdiction. A further appeal by Union of the court's decision was also denied. 

Strathroy and Beachville Transmission Facilities Expansion Program EBLO 230 
On October 20, 1988, Union proposed the construction of two sections of NPS 42 pipeline looping 
its Dawn-Trafalgar transmission system: an 18-kilometre section from Strathroy gate station toi 
Lobo compressor station, and a 20-kilometre section from the Beachville transmission station to 
the Bright compressor station. The new pipelines would complete Union's 42-inch looping pro- 
gram between the Dawn compressor station and the Kirkwall line extension; the pipeline would 
meet the increasing demand for transportation service by Union's customers. 

The hearing for Union's 1989 facilities took place on December 6, 1988, and the Board approved 
the project on February 14, 1988. 



GAS STORAGE APPLICATIONS 

TECUMSEH 

Designation of the Dow-Moore Pool EBO 147 

On January 26, 1988, Tecumseh applied to the Board to designate a depleted gas reservoir in Moore 
Township known as the Dow-Moore 3-21-XII Pool as a gas storage area. Tecumseh also requested 
authorization to inject gas into, store it in, and withdraw it from the pool. 

The Board found that this pool, which is jointly owned by Tecumseh and Union, is the largest 
remaining known pinnacle reef available for use as gas storage in southwestern Ontario. In its Report 
to the Lieutenant Governor in Council, submitted May 2, 1989, the Board recommended that the 
lands overlaying the pool should be designated as a gas storage area. Designation being granted, 
the Board approved Tecumseh's application to inject, store, and remove gas from the pool, subject 
to certain conditions. 



Dow-Moore Pool Pipeline EBLO 224 

The Board, in its Decision dated May 27, 1988, approved an application by Tecumseh to develop 
the Dow-Moore storage pool, and an application to construct a 7-kilometre NPS 24 pipeline to 
serve the pool. The new pipeline links Tecumseh's compressor station to the pool. The pipeline 
has been designed and tested to accommodate the peaking service requirements of Consumers in 
conjunction with Tecumseh's other storage pools. The pipeline has also been designed to accom- 
modate potential pressure elevations of the Dow-Moore pool. 

Dow-Moore Gas Storage Pool EBRM 89 

On June 5, 1988, the Minister of Natural Resources referred to the Board seven applications by 
Tecumseh for permits to drill into the Dow-Moore pool. The Board approved the applications subject 
to certain conditions in its Report of July 21 to the minister. A public hearing was not held since 
the applications were not contested. 

Storage Rates to Include Dow-Moore Pool Facilities EBRO 455-1 

On August 30, 1988, Tecumseh filed an application with the Board requesting a rate increase to 
allow for the recovery of costs relating to the operation of the Dow-Moore storage facility. A one- 
day hearing was held on November 17, 1988. In its Decision, dated December 5, the Board indicated 
that interim rate relief was warranted to recover a projected deficiency of about $1.1 million resulting 
from the operation of this facility. Acquisition and development of this facility increased Tecumseh's 
net investment by approximately 50 percent. 

Kimball-Colinville Pool EBRM 90/92 

Four applications by Tecumseh for permits to drill in the Kimball-Colinville pool were referred 
to the Board by the Minister of Natural Resources, three on June 6 and one on July 28, 1988. The 
Board approved the applications subject to certain conditions without a public hearing since they 
were not contested. 

UNION 

Dawn 156 Pool EBRM 91 

The Minister of Natural Resources referred two applications submitted by Union Gas for well permits 
in the Dawn 156 pool to the Board by letter dated July 5, 1988. The Board approved the applica- 
tions subject to certain conditions without a public hearing since they were not contested. 



*k\ 



GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS 



Argument The final step in a hearing, during which participants summarize their positions on 
various matters of concern based on the evidence adduced. 

Bcf One billion cubic feet, a measure of gas equivalent to 28.328 million cubic metres. 

Board Order A legal document directing the implementation of a Board Decision. An Order is 
binding on the indicated parties. 

Board Recommendation Usually contained in a Board report to a minister or to the Lieutenant 
Governor in Council, on Ontario Hydro or some other energy-related matter. Board recommen- 
dations are not binding except in matters set out under Section 23 of the Ontario Energy Board Act. 

Bulk Power Rates Wholesale electricity rates to municipalities and certain industrial customers 
of Ontario Hydro having an average annual power demand of 5,000 kilowatts or more. 

Buy/Sell Agreement Arrangement whereby an end-user purchases gas from a producer and then 
sells it to the local distribution utility which comingles that gas with other supplies. The end-user 
then buys gas from the local utility in the usual manner. The difference between the price paid 
to the producer and the price received from the local utility, minus any transportation costs, accrues 
to the end user. 

Bypass The total avoidance of the local distribution company's system for the transportation of gas. 

Commodity Charge A charge per unit volume of gas actually taken by the purchaser, as distin- 
guished from a demand charge which is a constant charge based on the maximum volume a buyer 
has the right to take whether or not any gas is taken in a given period. 

Contract Carriage Transportation service provided for the transport of gas not owned by the trans- 
porting pipeline company; contract carriage rates are sometimes referred to as T-rates. 

Contract Demand (CD) Gas which a utility or a customer has the contractual right to demand 
on a daily basis from the supplier of the gas. 

Demand Charge A monthly charge which normally covers the fixed costs of the system. The 
demand charge is based on the daily contracted volume and is payable regardless of volumes taken. 

Designated Gas Storage Area A land area containing geological formations into which the Board 
may authorize a person to inject, store, and remove gas. Injection of gas for storage into any geolog- 
ical formation outside a designated storage area is prohibited under Section 20 of the Ontario Energy 
Board Act. 

Direct Sales Purchases of natural gas supply negotiated between producers and end-users at prices 
excluding transportation; pipeline transportation arrangements must be negotiated separately with 
TCPL and the local distribution utility. 

Gigajoule (GJ) A measure of energy content in fuel. A typical residential consumer of gas might 
use about 130 gigajoules per year for household heating (one GJ of thermal energy equals approxi- 
mately 0.95 million cubic feet of natural gas). 

GWh Gigawatt hour 

Interrogatories Written requests for the supply of additional information, or clarification of infor- 
mation already received. 

Intervention Notice of intent to participate in hearings, stating the interest in the proceeding. The 
person or group is called an intervenor. 

LDC Local distribution company 

NPS Nominal pipe size; for example, NPS 24 refers to a pipe with an approximate exterior diameter 
of 610 mm or 24 inches. 



Ontario Pipeline Coordination Committee (OPCC) An interministerial committee, chaired by a 
member of the OEB staff, and including designates from those ministries of the Ontario govern- 
ment which collectively have a responsibility to ensure that pipeline construction and operation 
have minimum undesirable impact on the environment. The environment, perceived in a broad 
sense, covers agriculture, parklands, forests, wildlife, water resources, social and cultural resources, 
public safety, and landowner rights. 

Rate Base The amount that a utility has invested in assets that are used or are useful in providing 
service, minus accumulated depreciation, plus an allowance for working capital and any other items 
which the Board may determine. Rate base may also be net of accumulated deferred income taxes. 

Rate of Return on Common Equity Utility income, after tax, expressed as a percentage of the amount 
of common equity approved for inclusion in the utility's capital structure. 

Rate of Return on Rate Base The income, after tax, that a utility is allowed to earn expressed as 
a percentage of the rate base. Note that this return is not guaranteed to the utility. Rather, this 
is the return that the company has a reasonable opportunity to earn given forecast conditions. 

Revenue Requirement The allowed expenses of the utility are added to the allowed return on rate 
base to obtain the amount of revenue the utility must recover through rates to cover its costs of 
providing service. 

SGR System Gas Resale Arrangement, whereby a customer purchases gas from WGML at the 
Alberta border at a negotiated price. The gas is immediately resold to WGML/TCPL at the Alberta 
border at the price prevailing between the LDC and WGML/TCPL. The LDC then purchases 
the gas from WGML/TCPL at the Alberta border as part of its system supply, and the customer 
continues to be a sales customer of the LDC. 

System Gas Gas supplied under contract to TCPL by gas producers. 

TCPL TransCanada PipeLines Limited 

Test Year A prospective period of twelve consecutive months (usually the company's next full 
fiscal year) for which projections of revenues, costs, expenses, and rate base are studied by the 
Board in order to set rates which will allow the utility the opportunity to earn a reasonable rate 
of return. 

Throughput Volume Gas sales, direct purchase and transportation volumes, and, where applica- 
ble, storage volumes. 

Unbundled Rate A rate for an individual, separate component of service offered by a distributor, 
as opposed to a rate which combines the costs of a variety of component services. 

WMGL Western Marketing Group Limited 



A 



8 8 19 8 9 



COMMISSION DE L'ENERGIE DE ■ Q\ ■ \KIO 

RAPPORT ANNUEL 




Ontario 



TABLE DES MATIERES 

MESSAGE DU PRESIDENT 3 
INTRODUCTION 5 
STRUCTURE 11 
AUDIENCES PUBLIQUES 12 

RECAPITULATION DES ACTIVITES 14 

Les activites de la CEO : quelques 
exemples 16 

Examen des activites liees a Ontario 
Hydro 17 

Demandes de revision des tarifs du gaz 
naturel 18 

Demandes relatives a des 
installations 22 

Demandes relatives au stockage 
de gaz 24 

LEXIQUE DE TERMES ET INITIALES 26 



Les bureaux de la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario sont situes au 
2300, rue Yonge 
Bureau 2601 
Toronto, Ontario 
(416) 481-1967 

On peut se procurer des exemplaires du present rapport et d'autres publications de la Commis >i 
a la librairie du gouvernement de l'Ontario, au 880, rue Bay, Toronto (416) 326-5300. 

Les personnes habitant a l'exterieur de Toronto peuvent communiquer avec le Service des p\ m 
cations, ministere des Services gouvernementaux, 880, rue Bay, 5 e etage, Toronto (Ont£ c 
M7A 1N8. Pour les appels interurbains sans frais, composez le 1-800-668-9938. 

ISSN 0317-4891 

Photographies fournies par : 

Peter O'Dell (membres de la Commission, personnel et audience) 

Union (installations de gaz naturel) 

Ontario Hydro (centrales electriques) 




Ontario 



Ministry Ministere 
of de 

Energy I'Energie 



^ v % 

Energy/Energie 
Ontario 



Queen's Park 
Toronto, Ontario 
M7A 2B7 
416/965-4286 
Telex 0621 7880 



A son honneur Lincoln M. Alexander 
Lieutenant-gouverneur de la 
province de l 1 Ontario: 



J'ai 1' honneur de presenter le rapport annuel de la 
Commission de l'energie de l 1 Ontario decrivant les 
diverses activites de l'exercice 1988-1989. 



Veuillez agreer, votre honneur, 1' assurance de ma 
tres haute consideration. 



d^ 




L4s*\ 



Le ministre de I'Energie 
Lyn McLeod 



5SAGE DU PRESIDENT 



Vychowanec, c. 
lent. 



r., 





'ai quitte la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario en decembre 1984, pour y revenir en 
| juillet 1988 a titre de president. Durant ce bref intervalle, l'industrie du gaz nature] au Canada 
a subi de remarquables changements, dont les consequences, pour les distributeurs ontariens et 
leurs clients comme pour la Commission, ont ete non moins frappantes. 

A l'origine de cette evolution figurent l'Accord de l'Ouest et l'Entente sur les marches et les 
prix du gaz naturel, tous deux conclus en 1985. En vertu de ces accords, le gouvernement federal 
et les provinces productrices ont convenu d'instaurer, de concert avec les provinces consommatrices 
et l'industrie du gaz, un systeme de tarification concu pour suivre les mouvements du marche. II 
est vite apparu que les douze mois initialement prevus pour la mise en place du nouveau systeme 
n'allaient pas suffire. 

Depuis 1985, la Commission s'emploie a faire appliquer les deux accords, tache qui ne lui est 
pas facilitee par la legislation actuelle, qui demeure pratiquement inchangee depuis un quart de 
siecle. Par ses nombreuses decisions, la Commission a encourage la formation d'un marche du gaz 
naturel compose d'une multiplicity d'acheteurs et de vendeurs. Pourtant, en depit de progres certains, 
l'Accord et l'Entente attendent toujours leur mise en oeuvre definitive. 

Si la dereglementation ou, pour etre plus precis, la re-reglementation, s'est jusqu'a present soldee 
par une reduction des prix pour la quasi-totalite des clients, elle avantage nettement les importants 
consommateurs industriels, qui ont saisi sans tarder l'occasion de s'approvisionner directement aupres 
des producteurs. Neanmoins, les clients commerciaux de taille plus modeste achetent eux aussi du 
gaz directement aux producteurs de l'Alberta ou de la Saskatchewan, quand ils ne profitent pas 
des autres possibilites de rabais qui leur sont offertes. 

Les nouveaux arrangements ont fait surgir de nombreuses questions que la Commission devra 
trancher. Pendant l'exercice 1988-1989, celle-ci a d'ailleurs presente au lieutenant-gouverneur en 
conseil un rapport concernant la securite d'approvisionnement des consommateurs ontariens. Entre 
autres recommandations, il y est prone qu'on incite les acheteurs directs, et notamment les distri- 
buteurs locaux, a passer des contrats de la plus longue duree possible au regard du prix et d'autres 
considerations du meme ordre. 

Vers la fin de l'exercice financier, les arrangements relatifs aux fournitures conclus entre Western 
Gas Marketing Limited et les trois grands distributeurs de gaz de l'Ontario ont fait 1'objet d'audiences 
separees devant la Commission. II en a resulte trois decisions distinctes, rendues le 14 avril 1989, 
par lesquelles la Commission approuvait des tarifs comprenant le cout du gaz attribuable a ces 
arrangements. La Commission a decide de ne pas se prononcer pour l'instant sur les arrangements 
relatifs a la revente du gaz distribue qui, selon certains intervenants, constituaient une subvention 
croisee accordee aux depens des autres abonnes. Une audience generale pourrait etre tenue plus 
tard dans l'annee pour examiner cette question, ainsi que plusieurs autres aspects qui s'y rattachent. 

Les grands enjeux de la dereglementation etant desormais tires au clair, du moins pour la 
plupart, il serait opportun de s'attarder sur l'incidence quelle aura sur les abonnes de l'Ontario. 
La Commission devra eventuellement affiner certaines de ses decisions anterieures pour veiller a 
ce que le gaz soit fourni aux utilisateurs de cette province a des tarifs justes et raisonnables. 

Pendant l'annee ecoulee, la Commission a vu contester sa competence a deux reprises devant 
la Cour supreme de l'Ontario, et dans chaque cas, elle a obtenu gain de cause. Par ailleurs, elle 
a entame les preparatifs en vue de l'entree en vigueur de la Loi sur les services en francais et de 
la Loi sur le projet d'aide financiere aux intervenants. Le personnel de la Commission compte main- 
tenant quatre employes bilingues capables de fournir au public des services en francais. 



En ce qui a trait a la Loi sur le projet d'aide financiere aux intervenants, la Commission a ete 
chargee, avec deux autres instances officielles, de prendre part a un projet pilote de trois ans 
prevoyant l'octroi d'une aide financiere aux intervenants desireux de comparaitre a une audience. 
Pendant l'annee ecoulee, la Commission a redige les regies, pratiques et procedures afferentes a 
cette loi, qui ont recu la sanction du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil. La premiere audience tenue 
sous le regime de la nouvelle loi a porte sur le renvoi de la proposition d'Ontario Hydro relative 
au tarif de vente d'electricite en gros en 1990. 

Deux autres projets d'assez longue date ont pu etre menes a terme pendant l'annee. En effet, 
la Commission publiera sous peu la troisieme edition de son guide intitule Directives envi- 
ronnementales applicables a la localisation, la construction et V exploitation des canalisations de 
transport d'hydrocarbures en Ontario. Pour la premiere fois, ces directives paraitront egalement 
en version francaise. Qui plus est, les compagnies de gaz et les municipalites de l'Ontario ont adopte 
un contrat type de franchise, qui servira de base a toutes les demandes futures de franchise qui 
seront presentees dans les municipalites. 

En resume, l'annee s'est averee fructueuse et riche de defis, et je ne crois pas me tromper en 
disant que les douze mois a venir le seront tout autant. 



//Tyyv^t \/G/VL<®<^ (M^L 



S.J. Wychowanec, c.r. 

President, Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario 




Les membres de la Commission le 31 mars 1989 etaient, de gauche a droite : C.A. Wolf ]\ 
H.E. Andrews, D.A. Dean, J.C. Butler, vice-president, S.J. Wychowanec, c.r., preside^ 
M.A. Daub, R.M.R. Higgin, O.J. Cook. M. O'Farrell etait absent. 



h. 



RODUCTION 



'Ontario depend dans une large mesure du gaz naturel comme source d'energie et aussi 
I comme matiere premiere utilisee dans diverses industries, notamment celle des produits 
chimiques. Le gaz naturel constitue le principal combustible de tous les secteurs de l'economie, excepte 
celui des transports, et il est le combustible privilegie pour le chauffage de l'eau et des locaux dans 
la province. En fait, l'Ontario utilise plus de gaz naturel que toute autre province consommatrice, 
sa consommation representant environ 41 pour cent du total de la demande de gaz naturel cana- 
dien. Le gaz fournit quelque 30 pour cent de l'energie consommee dans la province, tandis que 
l'electricite, dont la popularite va croissant, represente 18 pour cent environ. Les combustibles liquides 
(petrole et liquides du gaz naturel), le charbon et le bois viennent completer la liste des sources 
d'energie consommee dans la province. 

La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario est chargee de reglementer l'industrie du gaz naturel, 
notamment en fixant les tarifs, en autorisant la construction des lignes de transport et en avalisant 
les accords de franchise. En outre, la Commission fournit des conseils au ministre de l'Energie sur 
des questions generates touchant l'industrie du gaz naturel, de meme que sur des aspects interes- 
sant Ontario Hydro. Dans tous les cas de figure, la Commission a pour principal souci de veiller 
a l'equite des tarifs, a la securite de l'approvisionnement et a la sauvegarde de l'interet public. 

Le present rapport commence par esquisser le mandat de la Commission, ainsi que le role et 
les obligations qui lui sont devolus, puis enchaine sur une liste des activites menees durant l'exercice 
ecoule, dont certaines, enfin, sont presentees dans leurs grandes lignes. 



MANDAT 

La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario a ete creee en 1960 a titre d'organisme officiel et impartial 
charge de reglementer divers aspects de l'industrie ontarienne du gaz naturel. Outre ses fonctions 
de reglementation, la Commission, a la demande du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil, du ministre 
de l'Energie ou du ministre des Richesses naturelles, formule des recommandations sur diverses 
questions relatives a l'energie, par exemple les modifications apportees par Ontario Hydro a ses 
tarifs de vente en gros. Dans toutes ses activites, la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario vise pour 
l'essentiel a servir le public et a proteger ses interets. 

La plupart des responsabilites et pouvoirs de la Commission sont enonces dans la Loi sur la 
Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario et, accessoirement, dans six autres lois, a savoir : 

• la Loi sur les concessions municipales; 

• la Loi sur les richesses petrolieres; 

• la Loi sur les services publics; 

• la Loi sur revaluation fonciere; 

• la Loi sur la Societe de chauffage par district de Toronto; 

• la Loi sur le projet d'aide financiere aux intervenants. 

La Loi sur le projet d'aide financiere aux intervenants a ete proclamee le l er avril 1989 par 
le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil. Ce projet, d'une duree de trois ans, prevoit un mecanisme pour 
financer d'avance le recours des intervenants qui comparaissent devant certaines instances officielles, 
y compris la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario. Elle present les criteres sur lesquels doit s'appuyer 
le comite d'examen, etabli sous le regime de la loi, lorsqu'il decide de la question de savoir si un 
intervenant est admissible ou non a une aide financiere. 



ROLE ET RESPONSABILITES 

FIXATION DES TARIFS DU GAZ NATUREL 

Toutes les compagnies de gaz naturel vendent et transportent du gaz dans les regions de la pro- 
vince ou elles detiennent une franchise. Le marche de l'energie est desormais soumis aux lois de 
la concurrence, car les acheteurs peuvent traiter directement avec les producteurs de gaz, ou opter 
pour une autre source d'energie. Du fait que le transport du gaz met en oeuvre un vaste reseau 
de pipelines et d'installations de stockage, le monopole demeure la plus efficace des formules, en 
ce sens qu'il ne tolere pas le double emploi et empeche les augmentations tarif aires qui en resulteraient. 



A 




Trois des employes bilingues 
de la Commission : de gau- 
che a droite, Nicholas Belak, 
Francoise Lafond et Peter 
O'Dell. 



En Ontario, les tarifs applicables a la vente de gaz doivent etre approuves par la Commission. 
Les distributeurs de gaz sont tenus de soumettre leurs projets de tarifs a l'approbation de la 
Commission, qui examine les demandes en general une fois par an. Les tarifs de chaque compagnie 
sont fixes a Tissue d'une audience publique. La duree de cette audience peut atteindre trois a quatre 
semaines, selon la complexite des enjeux. 

Les tarifs ne sont pas les memes pour les consommateurs residentiels, commerciaux et indus- 
triels. Lorsqu'elle etablit les tarifs, la Commission tient compte des couts associes aux fluctuations 
de la demande des differentes categories de consommateurs. Ainsi, la demande residentielle de gaz 
naturel utilise pour le chauffage varie en fonction des conditions meteorologiques et de la periode 
de la journee. Par consequent, il en coute plus cher, par unite, d'approvisionner les abonnes resi- 
dentiels que les industries, ces dernieres consommant de plus grandes quantites de gaz a des volumes 
plus constants. 

La Commission s'efforce de realiser un equilibre entre les prix que doivent payer les consom- 
mateurs, d'une part, et, d'autre part, le rendement que les actionnaires de chaque compagnie sont 
autorises a tirer de leur investissement. Les tarifs doivent etre « justes et raisonnables » pour les 
clients comme pour les actionnaires. Avant d'arreter une decision, la Commission prend en consi- 
deration les depenses anterieures, actuelles et futures, la conjoncture, les previsions, les tendances 
economiques et les recettes escomptees par les compagnies. 

La Commission peut accorder un redressement tarifaire provisoire aux compagnies et aux 
consommateurs lorsque les frais ou les revenus d'une compagnie de services publics subissent ou 
sont sur le point de subir des modifications importantes. En pareil cas, ces rajustements font l'objet 
d'une audience speciale qui dure generalement un jour ou deux. Les tarifs provisoires sont sujets 
a revision et ne deviennent definitifs qu'a partir du moment ou la Commission rend sa decision 
finale et emet une ordonnance. 

Dans le cadre des audiences relatives aux tarifs, la Commission doit non seulement s'assurer 
que les compagnies de services publics pratiquent des tarifs raisonnables, mais encore que le service 
fourni est de qualite satisfaisante. 

Consumers' Gas Company Ltd est le plus important distributeur canadien de gaz naturel. Au 
30 septembre 1988, date de cloture de son dernier exercice financier, cette compagnie desservait 
quelque 974 000 consommateurs residentiels, commerciaux et industriels dans le Sud, le centre 
et l'Est de l'Ontario, sans compter les abonnes de l'Ouest du Quebec et du Nord de l'Etat de 
New York, qu'elle approvisionne par l'intermediaire de filiates echappant au ressort de la Commis- 
sion. Toujours a la meme date, Consumers avait vendu 9,44 milliards de metres cubes de gaz, et 
achemine 0,492 milliard de metres cubes; sa base de tarification se chiffrait a 1,416 milliard de dollars, 
et elle affichait des recettes d'environ 1,7 milliard de dollars. 

Union Gas Limited, deuxieme compagnie de distribution ontarienne par ordre d'importance, 
approvisionne les consommateurs du Sud-Ouest de la province. Elle exploite aussi un reseau de 
pipelines, d'installations de stockage et de stations de compression pour le compte d'abonnes et 
d'autres entreprises de services publics dans l'Est de l'Ontario et au Quebec. Au 31 mars 1989, sa 
base de tarification s'etablissait a 1,027 milliard de dollars. Elle comptait plus de 573 000 clients 
residentiels, commerciaux et industriels, et son reseau aura debite un volume total estime a 
14,7 milliards de metres cubes pendant l'exercice financier 1989, y compris le gaz achemine a d'autres 
compagnies distributrices. Le volume total de gaz vendu et livre a des clients s'occupant de distri- 
bution (c'est-a-dire a des compagnies qui vendent ou transportent du gaz) atteignait 8 milliards 
de metres cubes. Pendant le meme exercice, Union Gas Ltd a realise des recettes d'environ 1,2 milliarc 
de dollars. 

ICG Utilities (Ontario) Ltd approvisionne en gaz une centaine de collectivites du Nord-Ouest 
du Nord et de l'Est de l'Ontario. Son reseau de distribution se compose de 6 142 kilometres d( 
pipelines raccordes a plus de 76 points de livraison sur le reseau de transport de TransCanadj 
PipeLines (TCPL). II s'agit en fait d'une serie d'antennes raccordees au reseau de TCPL a partii 
de Kenora, ou ce dernier penetre en Ontario pour se prolonger jusqu'aux rives du lac Ontark 
et du Saint-Laurent. Au 31 decembre 1988, la base de tarification moyenne d'ICG se chiffrait < 
395 millions de dollars. Pour approvisionner ses 168 000 abonnes, ICG a achemine en tout 3,07 mil 



^ 



liards de metres cubes, dont 230 millions de metres cubes ont ete transported pour le compte d'autres 
compagnies. Les recettes totales d'ICG ont atteint environ 443 millions de dollars. 

Natural Resource Gas Limited (NRG) est une petite entreprise de services publics fournissant 
du gaz a environ 2 000 abonnes dans la region d'Aylmer. Au 30 septembre 1988, NRG avait une 
base de tarification de 2,9 millions de dollars et affichait des recettes de 2,7 millions de dollars 
pour son exercice financier 1988. 

Tecumseh Gas Storage Limited exploite un reservoir de stockage de gaz dans le Sud-Ouest 
de l'Ontario. Cette compagnie a realise des recettes d'environ 15 millions de dollars pendant son 
exercice financier 1988. Consumers etait l'unique client de Tecumseh. 

EXAMEN DES TARIFS D'ONTARIO HYDRO 

Les tarifs de vente en gros d'electricite d'Ontario Hydro (applicables aux municipality et a certains 
consommateurs industriels) sont etablis par le Conseil d'administration de la societe. Toutefois, 
lorsque Ontario Hydro desire modifier ses tarifs, elle doit soumettre une proposition en ce sens au 
ministre de 1'Energie, qui saisit la Commission du dossier en lui fournissant toutes les donnees tech- 
niques et financieres pertinentes. A Tissue d'une audience publique qui debute generalement fin 
mai ou debut juin et qui dure environ quatre semaines, la Commission redige un rapport assorti 
de recommandations qu'elle remet au ministre de 1'Energie au plus tard le 31 aout de chaque annee. 
Le role de la Commission etant consultatif, ses recommandations n'ont pas force executoire pour 
Ontario Hydro. 

Ontario Hydro est la plus importante societe de la couronne en Ontario. Au 31 decembre 1988, 
elle possedait un actif de 34,36 milliards de dollars et desservait, directement ou indirectement, 
plus de 3,46 millions de consommateurs, dont 85 pour cent d'abonnes residentiels. La vente de 
128 000 GWh dans la province et de 5 019 GWh a l'exportation lui ont permis d'enregistrer un 
revenu de 5,8 milliards de dollars. 

RENVOIS ET AUDIENCES GENERALES 

Le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil, le ministre de 1'Energie et le ministre des Richesses naturelles 
peuvent demander a la Commission de tenir une audience publique sur une question precise et de 
leur faire rapport. D'habitude, ces renvois portent sur des questions liees a l'energie et suscitent 
souvent un vif interet parmi le public. La encore, la Commission joue un role consultatif, sans plus. 




\ /////\ CONSUMERS' GAS 
UNION GAS 



L^ICG 



Distribution du gaz naturel en Ontario 



A 



Par ailleurs, si une entreprise de services publics change de proprietaire, la Commission peut 
etre appelee a tenir une audience et a faire rapport. L'autorisation du lieutenant-gouverneur en 
conseil est obligatoire dans le cas d'une entreprise de services publics desireuse de vendre ses biens 
ou de fusionner avec une autre entreprise a vocation semblable, et dans le cas d'un particulier qui 
compte acheter plus de 20 pour cent des actions d'une entreprise de services publics, quelle que 
soit la categorie d'actions en cause. La Commission peut recommander qu'il n'y ait pas d'audience, 
ou peut au contraire tenir une audience et presenter son rapport et ses recommandations au 
lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil. 

La Commission peut aussi, de sa propre initiative, tenir des audiences generates pour examiner 
des questions qui relevent de ses competences. Ces audiences visent generalement a faire la lumiere 
sur des tendances nouvelles ou sur des domaines qui presentent un interet croissant, ou encore a 
examiner des sujets precis dans un contexte plus global que ne le permettrait une audience ponctuelle. 

APPROBATION DE NOUVELLES INSTALLATIONS 

Les entreprises de services publics souhaitant construire un pipeline pour le transport de gaz naturel 
en Ontario doivent obtenir l'autorisation de la Commission. En outre, tous les projets de construc- 
tion sont examines par le Comite ontarien de coordination des pipeline (COCP), organisme inter- 
ministeriel charge de la securite des pipelines et des repercussions environnementales resultant de leur 
construction. Place sous la presidence d'un membre de la Commission, le COCP se compose de 
representants des ministeres de 1' Agriculture et de l'Alimentation, de l'Energie, de l'Environnement, 
de la Consommation et du Commerce, des Richesses naturelles, de la Culture et des Communica- 
tions, des Affaires municipales et des Transports. Se joignent parfois au comite, lorsque le besoin 
sen fait sentir, les representants d'organismes regionaux que les compagnies de gaz naturel consultent 
aux premiers stades de leurs travaux de planification. 

Le COCP s'efforce d'eviter que la construction des pipelines n'entraine, a long terme, des conse- 
quences nefastes pour l'environnement, et veille a ce que les perturbations a court terme restent 
minimes pendant les travaux. Ce faisant, le comite revoit chaque proposition, etudie les diverses 
variantes pour les traces et les emplacements, et regie toutes les questions soulevees avant que la 
demande d'autorisation de construire ne soit presentee a la Commission. 

Lorsqu'elle recoit urie demande d'autorisation presentee par une compagnie de services publics, 
la Commission doit decider si le projet sert effectivement les interets du public, et ce au regard 
de nombreux facteurs, a savoir securite, praticabilite economique, retombees pour la collectivite, 
securite de 1'approvisionnement, avantages pour la compagnie, incidences environnementales, etc. 
La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario a publie des directives environnementales applicables a 
la localisation, la construction et l'exploitation des canalisations de transport d'hydrocarbures en 
Ontario. Ce document, elabore de concert avec les ministeres et organismes provinciaux interesses 
par la construction des pipelines, enonce tous les criteres a respecter. Une version revisee des 
Directives environnementales, qui paraitront pour la premiere fois en francais, est actuellement 
en chantier; elle rendra compte des toutes dernieres normes et pratiques appliquees par chaque 
ministere en matiere d'attenuation des repercussions environnementales et accordera au public une 
place plus importante dans la planification des projets de pipelines. 

Lorsqu'elle accorde son approbation a un projet, la Commission emet une ordonnance accor- 
dant l'autorisation de construire. Elle autorise egalement les expropriations necessaires a l'implan- 
tation de canalisations de transport et d'installations connexes, et son consentement est exige 
lorsqu'un pipeline doit traverser une autoroute, une ligne a haute tension ou un fosse. 

APPROBATION DES ACCORDS DE FRANCHISE 

Toute municipalite peut accorder a une compagnie de gaz le droit de fournir un service sur son 
territoire et d'utiliser les emprises routieres. Mais comme prealable a l'adoption de l'obligatoire regie- 
ment municipal qui autorise la franchise, la Commission doit approuver les conditions afferente: 
a l'accord de franchise. 

Bon nombre des ententes actuelles remontent a plus de trente ans. Etant donne les change 
ments considerables qui se sont operes depuis lors, les negociations entre une municipalite et I< 
compagnie de services publics peuvent etre longues et difficiles. C'est ainsi qu'on a cree en 198; 




'•&£*■**' 



mhirfk 



Auec urce capacite de 4100 megawatts, la centrale de Nanticoke, situee en bordure du lac Erie, pres 
de Port Dover, est la plus grande usine thermique alimentee au charbon d'Ontario Hydro. 



le Comite des accords de franchise, son mandat consistant a mettre au point un modele d'entente 
dont s'inspireraient toutes les ententes nouvelles ou reconduites. Le modele, en vigueur depuis 1988, 
etablit les conditions types devant presider a la distribution du gaz, a l'utilisation des emprises rou- 
tieres, aux autorisations de travaux, a la remise en etat des terres une fois la construction achevee, etc. 
Apres l'adoption de l'entente modele, la Commission a tenu trois audiences — une par 
compagnie — pour statuer sur les franchises municipales negociees par Union, Consumers et ICG. 
II s'agissait d'ententes renouvelees qui etaient en instance d'approbation. A l'automne 1988, quarante- 
neuf demandes de renouvellement de franchises ont ete presentees devant la Commission. Grace 
au caractere generique de toutes les demandes dont elle etait saisie, la Commission a pu realiser 
de considerables economies de temps et d'argent. II est prevu que desormais, toutes les ententes 
de franchise nouvelles et reconduites seront redigees a partir de ce modele. 

CERTIFICATS DE COMMODITE ET DE NECESSITE PUBLIQUES 

Nul ne peut construire un ouvrage d'approvisionnement en gaz sans l'autorisation prealable de la 
Commission. Delivree sous forme de certificat, cette autorisation n'est consentie que si la commodite 
et la necessite publiques semblent la justifier. 

STOCKAGE DU GAZ NATUREL 

L'aptitude a stocker le gaz est une condition sine qua non du bon fonctionnement du reseau de 
distribution de l'Ontario, et c'est pour cette raison que les reservoirs de stockage constituent une 
ressource naturelle tres importante pour l'economie de la province. La plupart des emplacements 
de stockage sont d'anciens gisements de gaz situes dans le Sud-Ouest de la province. lis sont utilises 
par les transporteurs et les distributeurs pour faire face aux fluctuations de la demande et aux situa- 
tions d'urgence. En regie generale, le gaz est stocke pendant l'ete alors que la demande est relative- 
ment faible, pour etre recupere en periode hivernale lorsque la demande est tres forte. Grace a 
ce systeme dequilibrage de la demande, le reseau de distribution du gaz provenant de l'Ouest 
canadien peut fonctionner efficacement. 

En vertu de la Loi sur la Commission de 1'energie de l'Ontario, il est interdit de stocker du 
gaz dans une formation geologique a moins qu'il ne s'agisse d'un emplacement designe conforme 
a la description figurant dans le Reglement 700 des Reglements revises de l'Ontario, 1980. Lorsqu'elle 
etudie une demande visant l'amenagement d'un reservoir naturel de stockage, la Commission doit 
decider si la structure geologique se prete a l'usage propose et, dans l'affirmative, en definir les 



limites geographiques; si le requerant a le droit d'exploiter pareil reservoir; si la demande corres- 
pond a un besoin reel; et si elle est praticable sur le plan economique. La Commission recommande 
au lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil les emplacements a designer pour le stockage; elle autorise leur 
utilisation et decide de 1'indemnisation payable au proprietaire en cas de disaccord entre ce dernier 
et le requerant. 

Les demandes de permis pour le forage de puits dans une zone designee de stockage de gaz 
doivent etre soumises a l'examen de la Commission par le ministre des Ressources naturelles, au 
nom duquel les permis sont delivres. Si le requerant est egalement 1'exploitant autorise de la zone 
de stockage, la Commission peut traiter la demande comme elle l'entend avant de faire rapport 
au ministre. Toutefois, si le requerant n'est pas 1'exploitant autorise, la Commission doit tenir une 
audience publique. 

Les compagnies qui desirent stocker des fluides sous pression dans une formation geologique 
doivent obtenir un permis aupres du ministere des Richesses naturelles. Si le puits d'injection est 
situe a moins de 1,6 kilometre d'une zone designee pour le stockage du gaz, le ministre doit demander 
a la Commission d'etudier la question et de presenter un rapport a ce sujet, conformement a la 
Loi sur les richesses petrolieres. 

La Commission reglemente les modalites d'association entre divers interets qui s'unissent pour 
le forage et l'exploitation de puits de gaz et de petrole dans les limites d'une surface unitaire, d'un 
champ ou d'un gisement. A ce propos, elle a competence pour designer les gestionnaires et repartir 
les couts et les avantages associes au forage et a l'exploitation. 

AUTRES QUESTIONS 

Les compagnies de gaz naturel doivent utiliser le systeme de comptabilite etabli par la Commission 
et ne peuvent s'en ecarter sans son autorisation prealable. La Commission poursuit son travail de 
mise a jour du reglement prescrivant la classification des methodes de comptabilite. II s'agit de la 
premiere refonte de ce document depuis l'adoption de la Loi sur la Commission de l'energie de 
l'Ontario en 1966. 

Les compagnies de gaz naturel communiquent regulierement a la Commission des donnees sur 
leurs operations et leurs resultats financiers. Lorsque les recettes d'une compagnie sont trop faible; 
ou trop elevees par rapport au rendement permis, l'agent de la Commission charge de l'examer 
des rendements en matiere d'energie peut conduire une enquete speciale avec le concours de sor 
personnel. La Commission peut, de sa propre initiative, obliger une compagnie a comparaitre devan 
elle pour lui fournir des explications sur la provenance et la justification de ses benefices. 

La nature des services publics evolue au rythme des conditions economiques et sociales. II es 
par consequent approprie que la Commission procede a un examen des lois qui touchent les service: 
publics et, au besoin, quelle propose des amendements. 



rRUCTURE 



ORGANIGRAMME AU 31 MARS 1989 



COMMISSION DE L'ENERGIE DE L'ONTARIO 





PRESIDENT 






S I Wychowanec. c r 




















SECRETAIRE DU PRESIDENT 






I E Byrnes 












I 




I 




I 






I 




1 






DIOINTE 
ISTRAT1VE DE 




AVOCATE DE LA 
COMMISSION 




SECRETAIRE DE LA 

COMMISSION 






VICE-PRESIDENT 




DIRECTEUR-OPERATIONS 
TECHNIQUES 




ACENT-RENDEMENT 

ENERGETIQUE DIRECTEUR 

DES FINANCES 


• MMI'.sl '". 


A Maleszyk 


SAC Thomas 


1 C Bullet 


P Coroyannakis 




R A Cappadocia 


I 




I 




I 














1 




1 


ES nt SOUTIEN 




Ai.oralr adjointl Jc 
la commission 

S McWilhams 

Slagiaire 

D Campbell 




la Commission 

P ODell 

Preposee aux dossiers 

C Parkes 




MEMBRES DE LA 
COMMISSION 




D1RECTEURS PRINCIPALS 
DE PROIETS 




AGENTS ADIOINTS- 
RENDEMENT ENERGETIQUE 

N Belak 

C Chaplin 

A Meddows-Tavlor 

P Vlahos 

ADIOINTE-COMPTABII.ITE 
GENERALE 




| ( In, 

t„nn,., 
i Daves 


D A Dean 

O ] Cook 

C A Wolf Jr 

R Higg.n 

Posies vacanls (2) 

MEMBRES A TEMPS 
PARTIEL DE LA 
COMMISSION 


E Mills 
A Powell 
Posle vacanl 

AGENT CHARGE DES 

PROIETS SPEC1AUX 


K lohn 
frsen-Traikov 

IV.H.d.lll 












<r/, <it de textt 
Arseniievic 




D Cochran 
CHEFS DE PROIETS 


S L.la 




M A Daub 
M OFarrell 
H Andrews 


mihecain 

Butcill, 

Hadimmslratmn 
D less 

RfolMIStl 

UtonJ 


R Bell 
H Celler 
I Girvan 

K L.ll 
N McKay 
C Mack.e 
A Parekh 
M Roberls 
COORDONNATEURS DE 
PROIETS 






















Posies vacanls 12) 

COORDONNATRICE DES 
SYSTEMES 






G Mayer 

ANALYSTE CHARCEE DE 
LA RECHERCHE 






T Meil 





Au cours de lexercice 1988-1989, la Commission a employe 49 personnes a temps plein. 






STRUCTURE FINANCIERE 

La Loi sur la Commission de lenergie de l'Ontario autorise la Commission a recouvrer ses frais 
en imposant des redevances aux entreprises de services publics qui participent aux audiences et 
a d'autres activites connexes de la Commission. Suite a l'audience, la Commission remet a l'entre- 
prise de services publics en cause une ordonnance de coiits. En vertu de cette ordonnance, l'entre- 
prise est tenue de payer une partie des frais engages par la Commission et, si cette derniere en decide 
ainsi, des frais engages par les intervenants. Le montant a payer a la Commission comprend les 
depenses directes et les debours associes a une audience, de meme que le montant verse pour payer 
les couts fixes etablis par la Commission, y compris les frais generaux et les salaires. 

Pour 1'exercice 1988-1989, le budget d'exploitation de la Commission etait de 5,4 millions de 
dollars. De ce montant, 75 pour cent seront recuperes par l'entremise des ordonnances de couts 
remises aux compagnies. 



A 



AUDIENCES PUBLIQUES 



es audiences publiques sont l'un des principaux mecanismes grace auxquels la Commission 
| de l'energie de l'Ontario peut s'acquitter de son mandat. Les audiences publiques donnent 
egalement la possibilite de se faire entendre aux groupes et particuliers qui peuvent etre affectes 
par les decisions de la Commission. La participation du public permet a la Commission de s'assurer 
que ses decisions sont justes et qu'elles tiennent compte des divers points de vue et interets. L'audience 
est un processus en onze etapes. 

1 DEBUT 

Le processus est mis en branle : 

• sur reception d'une demande; 

• sur reception d'une demande de renvoi adressee par le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil, le minis- 
tre de l'Energie ou le ministre des Richesses naturelles; ou 

• lorsque la Commission decide de commencer a etudier une question relevant de sa competence. 

2 AVIS DE PRESENTATION DUNE DEMANDE 

Les requerants doivent aviser de la presentation de leur demande toutes les parties concernees et 
tous les groupes publics interesses. Lorsque la Commission commence le processus d'audience, elle 
doit en aviser qui de droit. Lorsque l'audience porte sur une forte modification de tarif, la compagnie 
de gaz naturel doit faire publier une annonce dans les quotidiens de la region touchee. 

Lorsqu'une demande touche les habitants de certaines regions designees par le gouvernement, 
tous les avis doivent egalement paraitre en francais dans des quotidiens de langue francaise. Si aucun 
quotidien de langue francaise n'est publie dans la region, l'avis doit paraitre dans un hebdomadaire 
de langue francaise. 

3 INTERVENTIONS 

Les groupes et les personnes qui desirent participer a une audience — les « intervenants » — doivent 
deposer un avis d'intervention decrivant les raisons pour lesquelles ils desirent etre presents. 

En 1988-1989, les participants avaient la possibilite de demander le remboursement de leurs 
frais de participation a Tissue de l'audience. Puis, le l er avril 1989, la Loi sur le projet d'aide finan- 
ciere aux intervenants est entree en vigueur; celle-ci etablit une procedure en vertu de laquelle lesj 
intervenants peuvent demander une indemnisation avant la tenue de l'audience. Un comite de finan- 
cement nomme par la Commission decide si les requerants sont admissibles a cette aide et, le ( 
cas echeant, le montant qui leur sera verse. Les participants peuvent continuer a demander le 
remboursement de leurs frais a la cloture de l'audience, comme par le passe. 



k 




Audience publique tenue pour examiner une proposition de revision de tarif s presentee par Ontarii 
Hydro. 







rille Cook, membre de la 
nmission, prepare une 
ision officielle. 



4 AVIS D' AUDIENCE 

Lorsque la Commission a determine la nature et la duree probable de l'audience, elle demande au 
requerant d'aviser toutes les parties concernees de l'heure a laquelle aura lieu l'audience et du lieu 
ou elle se deroulera. 

5 DOCUMENTATION PREPARATOIRE 

Af in de permettre a toutes les parties d'etudier la documentation relative a la demande, le requerant 
doit remettre les documents a l'appui de sa demande deux a trois mois avant le debut de l'audience. 
Le personnel de la Commission et les intervenants peuvent egalement obtenir des renseignements 
supplementaires en demandant a l'entreprise de services publics de repondre a des questionnaires 
ecrits avant le debut de l'audience. 

Lorsque la demande porte sur la construction de pipelines, elle est d'abord etudiee par le Comite 
ontarien de coordination des pipelines. Par consequent, les documents preparatoires doivent indiquer 
le trace choisi et etre accompagnes d'etudes portant sur les repercussions environnementales prevues. 

6 ORDONNANCES DE PROCEDURE 

La Commission peut emettre une ordonnance de procedure pour une affaire specif ique. Entre autres, 
cette ordonnance peut determiner la date de l'audience ou prevoir la date limite avant laquelle 
certaines formalites de procedure doivent etre accomplies, telles que le depot de preuves justificatives, 
l'envoi de questionnaires et la communication des resultats de ces questionnaires. L'ordonnance 
de procedure peut egalement prevoir une liste des questions a aborder lors de l'audience. 

7 DELIBERATIONS LIMINAIRES 

Avant le debut de l'audience, les representants de la Commission peuvent proposer de revoir les 
questions de procedure, les points techniques et la demarche qui sera suivie pendant l'audience. 
De cette maniere, tous les participants peuvent se familiariser avec tous les aspects de la demande 
et definir les questions qu'ils desirent soulever. 

8 AUDIENCE 

La Commission s'assure que les preuves presentees sont suffisantes, qu'elles sont verifiees et versees 
au dossier, de facon a rendre sa decision en connaissance de cause. En regie generale, c'est le reque- 
rant qui presente d'abord son argumentation, en produisant des preuves ecrites et en faisant com- 
paraitre des temoins. Les intervenants et l'avocat de la Commission interrogent ensuite les temoins 
et peuvent eux aussi faire entendre leurs propres temoins. Ces derniers peuvent etre interroges par 
le requerant et par les autres intervenants. Lorsque toutes les preuves ont ete presentees, chaque 
partie peut recapituler les faits dans une plaidoirie ecrite ou verbale, selon les directives de la 
Commission. 

Les documents preparatoires, les plaidoiries et les transcriptions des deliberations qui ont eu 
lieu a l'audience sont tenus a la disposition du public, au bureau de la Commission, a Toronto. 

9 DECISIONS ET RAPPORTS DE LA COMMISSION 

Selon que l'audience resulte, soit d'un renvoi, soit d'une demande ou d'un avis de la Commission, 
cette derniere doit presenter un resume de ses deliberations dans un document intitule « Rapport » 
ou « Decision et motifs ». Ce document porte sur toutes les questions soulevees lors de l'audience 
et enonce les recommandations et les conclusions de la Commission. Sa publication peut exiger 
plusieurs semaines ou meme plusieurs mois, selon la complexite de l'af faire. On peut se procurer 
des exemplaires du document, contre paiement d'une somme modique, a la Librairie du gouverne- 
ment de l'Ontario, 800, rue Bay, a Toronto. La Commission en remet des exemplaires aux personnes 
ayant participe a l'audience. 

Dans la plupart des affaires prises en charge par la Commission a la demande du lieutenant- 
gouverneur en conseil, du ministre de l'Energie ou du ministre des Richesses naturelles, les parties 
concernees ne sont pas tenues de se conformer aux recommandations de la Commission. Le minis- 
tre concerne ou le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil decide s'il doit ou non donner suite a ses recom- 
mandations. Toutefois, lorsqu'il s'agit d'un renvoi de la part du ministre des Richesses naturelles 
au sujet d'un permis de forage, le ministre doit se conformer aux recommandations de la Commission. 



A 



10 ORDONNANCE DE LA COMMISSION 

Une ordonnance de la Commission est un document juridique sommant les parties citees de mettre 
a execution la decision de la Commission. Elle a force executoire. 

11 REVISION ET APPEL 

On peut interjeter appel d'une decision ou d'une ordonnance de la Commission comme suit : 

• en demandant a la Commission d'annuler ou de modifier son ordonnance; 

• en adressant une petition au lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil; 

• en interjetant appel de l'ordonnance de la Commission devant la Cour divisionnaire sur une 
question de droit ou de competence juridique; 

• en demandant a la Cour divisionnaire de proceder a une revision judiciaire de la decision de 
la Commission. 



RECAPITULATION DES ACTIVITES 

Resume des activites de la Commission de Venergie de I'Ontario entre le l er avril 1988 
etle31 mars 1989 



N° DE DOSSIER 



REQUERANT/AUTEUR 

DE LA DEMANDE OBJET 



Demandes de revision des tarifs de transport/ distribution du gaz naturel 



EBRO 411-HI-A/430II-A Falconbridge 
EBRO 440-2 ICG 



EBRO 


451-1 


NRG 


EBRO 


452 


Consumers 


EBRO 


452-3 


Consumers 


EBRO 


455-1 


Tecumseh 


EBRO 


456 


Union 


EBRO 


456-4 


Union 



Clarification/nouvelle audience a propos des tarifs d'ICG 

Recuperation des couts du gaz dans le cadre de contrats conclus 

avec WGML 

Recuperation interimaire des couts differes du gaz 

Redressement des niveaux et de la structure des tarifs pour les 

exercices financiers 1988 et 1989 

Recuperation des couts du gaz dans le cadre de contrats conclus 

avec WGML 

Recuperation interimaire des couts encourus dans le cadre des 

immobilisations liees a l'amenagement du reservoir de Dow-Moore 

Redressement des niveaux et de la structure des tarifs pour les 

exercices financiers 1988 et 1989 

Recuperation des couts du gaz dans le cadre de contrats conclus 

avec WGML 



Renvoi de la part du ministre de VEnergie au sujet d'Ontario Hydro 
HR 17 Ministere de l'Energie Tarifs pour 1989 



Renvoi de la part du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil 

EBRLG 30A/B Consumers Engagements 

EBRLG 32 CEO Securite de l'approvisionnement 



Construction de pipelines et expropriations 
EBLO 223 Consumers 



EBLO 


224 


Tecumseh 


EBLO 


225 


Consumers 


EBLO 


226 


Union 


EBLO 


226A 


TCPL 


EBLO 


227 


Union 


EBLO 


228 


ICG 


EBLO 


229 


ICG 


EBLO 


230 


Union 



Poste de livraison de Rugby et pipeline de renfort de la baie 

Georgienne 

Amenagement du reservoir de stockage de Dow-Moore et 

construction d'un pipeline 

Autorisation de construction — pipeline Peterborough/Lindsay 

Pipeline St Clair 

Competence en ce qui concerne le pipeline St Clair 

Pipeline de stockage Dawn 156 

Pipeline de Horseshoe Valley 

Pipeline de Prices Corners 

Agrandissement des installations de Strathroy et Beachville 



k 



N° DE DOSSIER 



REQUERANT/AUTEUR 

DE LA DEMANDE OBJET 



Exemptions relatives aux pipelines 

Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
ICG 



PL 


63 


PL 


64 


PL 


65 


PL 


66 


PL 


67 


PL 


68 


PL 


. 69 



Pipeline du village de Burford 

Pipeline du chemin Towerline (cantons de Norwich et Burford) 

Pipeline du chemin Towerline (canton de Burford) 

Pipeline du canton de Caradoc 

Pipeline de stockage de Sombra (canton de Lambton) 

Pipeline de stockage d'Enniskillen (canton de Lambton) 

Pipeline reliant la ligne de TCPL a la centrale de cogeneration de 

Northland Power a Cochrane 



Autres ordonnances de la Commission de lenergie de I'Ontario 



EBO 


147 


Tecumseh 


EBO 


149 


Union 


EBO 


150 


Union 


EBO 


154 


Union 


EBO 


155 


Union 


EBO 


156 


Tecumseh 


EBO 


158 


Union 


Autorisations relatives 


aux franchises 


EBA 


405/472 


Union 


EBA 


470 


Consumers 


EBA 


473 


Consumers 


EBA 


474 


Consumers 


EBA 


475 


Consumers 


EBA 


476 


Consumers 


EBA 


477 


Consumers 


EBA 


479 


Consumers 


EBA 


488 


Consumers 


EBA 


489 


Consumers 


EBA 


490 


ICG 


EBA 


491 


ICG 


EBA 


494 


Consumers 


EBA 


495 


Consumers 


EBA 


496 


Consumers 


EBA 


498 


ICG 


EBA 


499 


ICG 


EBA 


500 


ICG 


EBA 


501 


ICG 


EBA 


502 


Consumers 


EBA 


503 


ICG 


EBA 


504 


Union 


EBA 


505 


Union 


EBA 


506 


Union 


EBA 


507 


Union 


EBA 


508 


Union 


EBA 


509 


Union 


EBA 


510 


Union 


EBA 


511 


Union 


EBA 


512 


Union 



Designation du reservoir de Dow-Moore 

Contrat de stockage et de transport pour la Commission des 

services publics de Kingston 

Contrat de stockage et de transport pour Consumers 

Entente de stockage pour Tarpon Gas Marketing 

Demande relative au transport sous contrat pour C-I-L 

Contrat de stockage pour Consumers 

Entente de stockage et de transport pour Domtar 



Ville de Blenheim 

Comte de Victoria 

Ville de Shelburne 

Ville de Caledon 

Ville d'Innisfil 

Canton d' Amaranth 

Ville de Whitby 

Canton de Mulmur 

Canton de Melancthon 

Canton de Cavan 

Cite de Sault-Sainte-Marie 

Canton d' Augusta 

Canton de Hope 

Canton de Hamilton 

Canton de Monaghan sud 

Canton d'Hamilton 

Canton d'Osnabruck 

Canton de Fredericksburgh nord 

Canton de Kingston 

Canton de Seymor 

Canton de Medonte 

Comte de Kent 

Cite de Chatham 

Ville de Dresden 

Ville de Tilbury 

Village d'Erie Beach 

Village de Highgate 

Village de Wheatley 

Village de Wyoming 

Canton d'Adelaide 



A 



N° DE DOSSIER 



REQUERANT/AUTEUR 

DE LA DEMANDE OBJET 



EBA 


513 


Union 


Canton de Camden 


EBA 


514 


Union 


Canton de Chatham 


EBA 


515 


Union 


Canton de Dover 


EBA 


516 


Union 


Canton de Harwich 


EBA 


517 


Union 


Canton de Howard 


EBA 


518 


Union 


Canton d'Orford 


EBA 


519 


Union 


Canton de Raleigh 


EBA 


520 


Union 


Canton de Romney 


EBA 


521 


Union 


Canton de Tilbury est 


EBA 


522 


Union 


Canton de Zone 


EBA 


523 


Union 


Ville de Forest 


EBA 


524 


Union 


Ville de Parkhill 


EBA 


525 


Union 


Village d'Arkona 


EBA 


526 


Union 


Village d'Ailsa Craig 


EBA 


527 


Union 


Village de Thedford 


EBA 


528 


Union 


Canton de Bosanquet 


EBA 


529 


Union 


Canton de Williams est 


EBA 


530 


Union 


Canton de Williams ouest 


EBA 


531 


Union 


Comte de Lambton 


EBA 


532 


Consumers 


Village de Port McNicholl 



Certificats de commodite et de necessite publiques 

EBC 139-B ICG 

EBC 182 Consumers 

EBC 183 Consumers 

EBC 184 Consumers 

EBC 185 Consumers 

EBC 186 Consumers 

EBC 187 ICG 



Canton d'Oro 
Village de Coldwater 
Canton de Medonte 
Canton de Hope 
Canton de Hamilton 
Canton de Monaghan sud 
Canton de Medonte 



Ordonnances de comptabilite uniforme 
U4 076 ICG 



Report des couts relatifs a certaines audiences 



Rapports au ministre des Richesses naturelles 



EBRM 89 

EBRM 90 

EBRM 91 

EBRM 92 



Tecumseh 
Tecumseh 
Union 
Tecumseh 



Permis de forage dans le reservoir de Dow-Moore 
Permis de forage dans le reservoir de Kimball-Colinville 
Permis de forage dans le reservoir Dawn 156 
Permis de forage dans le reservoir de Kimball-Colinville 



LES ACTIVITES DE LA CEO : QUELQUES EXEMPLES 

AUDIENCE RELATIVE A LA SECURITE DE L'APPROVISIONNEMENT EBRLG 32 
A la demande du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil, faite par renvoi date du 19 mai 1988, la 
Commission a tenu une audience pour examiner plusieurs questions ayant trait aux besoins actuels 
et futurs des consommateurs de l'Ontario en matiere d'approvisionnement en gaz. Pendant les 
quatorze jours qu'a dure l'audience, des representants de tous les secteurs de l'industrie du gaz ont 
pris part aux deliberations (producteurs, courtiers, transporteurs, distributeurs et usagers). LaJ 
Commission a presente son rapport interimaire en aout 1988, qu'elle a fait suivre en novembre 
de son rapport final, dans lequel figuraient les recommandations suivantes : 






k 




i Thomas, secretaire de 
Commission, donne suite 
\e demande soumise a la 
3. 



le gouvernement devrait encourager des investissements prudents en vue d'accroitre la capacite 

de stockage; 

la Commission devrait examiner periodiquement les preoccupations exprimees au sujet des 

approvisionnements en gaz et de toute question connexe; 

le gouvernement devrait publier des directives pour permettre au public de mieux comprendre 

les pratiques contractuelles en vigueur dans l'industrie; 

il y aurait lieu d'encourager les parties interessees a signer des contrats de longue duree, sans 

les assortir de conditions ou normes obligatoires; 

les contrats regissant les arrangements de transport pour les clients qui achetent directement 

ou qui achetent pour revendre devraient etre conclus pour une duree de trois ans, a moins que 

la Commission n'accorde une exemption; 

il serait souhaitable de concevoir des politiques permettant de mettre toute surcapacite de 

transport a la disposition d'autres distributeurs ou acheteurs directs de l'Ontario; 

il n'y aurait pas lieu de definir un « marche de base », ni de limiter les consommateurs, quels 

qu'ils soient, dans leur choix d'un fournisseur; 

le gouvernement devrait etudier I'opportunite de constituer une reserve strategique de gaz a 

utiliser pendant les periodes ou les approvisionnements sont insuffisants en Ontario. 

AUDIENCES RELATIVES AU COUT DU GAZ EBRO 440-2, 452-3, 456-4 

Comme elle l'a signale dans son Rapport annuel de Tan dernier, la Commission a rendu publiques, 

le 22 Janvier 1988, trois decisions simultanees concernant les nouvelles ententes negociees par les 

trois principales compagnies de gaz de la province (Consumers, ICG et Union) avec Western Gas 

Marketing Limited (WGML). La Commission a ainsi approuve la prorogation de ces ententes pendant 

un an, soit jusqu'au 31 octobre 1988, afin de favoriser le developpement d'un marche plus 

concurrentiel. 

En aout et octobre 1988, les trois compagnies ont demande a la Commission d'approuver, 
aux fins d'etablissement de leurs tarifs, le cout du gaz a fournir en vertu de contrats qu'elles venaient 
de negocier avec WGML. Ces trois contrats de vente se ressemblent du point de vue de leur struc- 
ture, en ce sens que le gaz est vendu en deux blocs, Tun et l'autre a un tarif de 2,20 dollars par 
gigajoule, le bloc A etant toutefois destine au 'groupe des clients essentiels', et negocie pour une 
periode plus longue (quinze et douze ans). Le prix de ce bloc comprend une prime fixe de 0,60 dollar 
par gigajoule pour toute la duree du contrat. Quant au bloc B, qui represente un volume plus 
modeste, il est negocie pour une periode moins longue (cinq ou trois ans) et est destine aux gros 
utilisateurs. 

A Tissue d'audiences tenues en fevrier et mars 1989, la Commission a rendu trois decisions 
datees du 14 avril 1989, par lesquelles elle approuvait, aux fins de tarification, le cout du gaz prevu 
dans les contrats passes avec WGML. Les details des modalites applicables a chaque compagnie 
sont presentes ci-apres. 



EXAMEN DES ACTIVITES LIEES A ONTARIO HYDRO 

PROPOSITION RELATIVE AUX TARIFS DE VENTE EN GROS D'ELECTRICITE HR 17 

Le 19 avril 1988, le ministre de l'Energie a soumis a la Commission la proposition d'Ontario Hydro, 
qui souhaitait augmenter ses tarifs a compter du l er Janvier 1989. Cette proposition prevoyait une 
majoration moyenne de 5,5 pour cent touchant l'ensemble de sa clientele, et etait calculee en fonc- 
tion d'un revenu minimum necessaire de 5 942 millions de dollars, soit 495 millions de dollars de 
plus que les recettes de 1988. 

Dans son rapport, la Commission a recommande que le tarif general moyen soit releve de 
5,8 pour cent et qu'Ontario Hydro verse au gouvernement provincial un droit de garantie de dette 
de 25 millions de dollars. En tout, la Commission a presente 46 recommandations au ministre de 
l'Energie. Elle a aussi exprime son inquietude au sujet de plusieurs problemes : duree des audiences 
trop limitee pour permettre d'eclaircir toutes les questions posees; degre de controle exerce sur les 
couts d'exploitation, d'entretien et d'administration d'Ontario Hydro; et repartition des fonds de 
gestion de la demande detenus par Ontario Hydro. 



A 





La centrale electrique Otto Holden, installation de 243 megawatts situee en bordure de la riviere 
des Outaouais, approvisionne les abonnes d'Ontario Hydro en energie depuis les annees cinquante. 



DEMANDES DE REVISION DES TARIFS DU GAZ NATUREL 

CONSUMERS 

Demande relative aux tarifs principaux EBRO 452 

Le 28 mars 1988, Consumers a presente a la Commission une demande d'augmentation de ses tarifs 
pour son exercice 1989 commencant le l er octobre 1988, afin de compenser une insuffisance prevue 
des recettes brutes evaluee a 9,7 millions de dollars. Par la suite, de nouveaux calculs ont trans- 
forme ce deficit en surplus de 17,2 millions de dollars sur la base d'un rendement des capitaux propres 
de 14,375 pour cent et d'un ratio des actions de 35 pour cent. Commencee le 20 juillet 1988, l'audience 
a ete ajournee 18 jours plus tard, pour reprendre le 6 septembre; elle s'est terminee le 20 septembre. 
La seconde phase portait essentiellement sur la repartition des couts et l'etablissement de la structure 
tarifaire. 

Au cours de l'audience, la Commission a ordonne une reduction tarifaire de 0,1433 cent le 
metre cube a compter du 19 juillet 1988, en raison d'un excedent de recettes evalue a 13,7 millions 
de dollars par Consumers pour l'exercice 1988. Dans sa decision avec motifs du 21 decembre 1988, 
la Commission a evalue a 36,2 millions de dollars le surplus des revenus bruts pour l'exercice 1989, 
sur la base d'un rendement des capitaux propres de 13,5 pour cent et d'un ratio des actions ordinaires 
de 35 pour cent. Le 12 Janvier 1989, dans un additif a sa decision, la Commission a rajuste les 
couts du gaz pour tenir compte de certains couts rattaches aux transactions d'achat et de vente. 
Cet additif portait a 38,3 millions de dollars le surplus de recettes brutes pour l'exercice 1989. 

Le 18 Janvier 1989, Consumers a presente une demande en vertu de l'article 30 visant a faire 
examiner et modifier certaines parties de la decision du 21 decembre 1988. La compagnie arguail 
qu'elle ne pourrait atteindre le taux de rendement permis des capitaux propres si la Commissior 
continuait d'imposer un plafond sur le taux de rendement autorise pour les tarifs appliques a certain; 
clients. Dans sa decision du 6 fevrier 1989, la Commission, tout en reaffirmant que les tarifs devraien 1 
s'aligner davantage sur les couts, a autorise la compagnie a se rapprocher progressivement de ce 
objectif . Elle a aussi etabli un compte de report pour pallier a une eventuelle insuffisance de recettes 



Demande relative aux tarifs principaux — Consumers 



Demande 



Autorise 



millions de dollars 



Base de tarification 
Recettes de la compagnie 
Revenus excedentaires bruts 



1516,5 




1500,9 


199,4 




203,3 


17,2 




38,3 




pourcentage 




13,15 




13,54 


12,52 




12,06 


35,00 




35,00 


14,375 




13,50 



Taux de rendement indique 
Taux de rendement necessaire 
Ratio des actions ordinaires 
Rendement des capitaux propres 



Engagements EBRLG 30 A/B 

Le 3 fevrier 1988, Consumers a demande l'autorisation de financer par l'emprunt sa filiale Gazifere 
Inc. et de continuer a investir dans Arbor Living Centres Inc. par l'intermediaire de Congas Holdings, 
une autre filiale. Ces demandes ont ete presentees suite aux engagements que la compagnie avait 
pris vis-a-vis du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil le 4 mars 1987. L'audience a debute le 3 mai 1988, 
et les arguments ont ete presentes verbalement le lendemain. 

Dans sa decision du 30 juin 1988, la Commission a fait observer que la demande soulevait 
plusieurs questions a propos de l'ampleur et du degre de diversification qui pourrait etre autorisee 
chez la compagnie de services publics, et au sujet des criteres a appliquer pour fixer des limites 
prudentes a ce genre d'investissement. Tout en indiquant que le niveau actuel d'investissements 
pourrait etre maintenu, sous reserve de certaines conditions, la Commission a demande instam- 
ment a Consumers de s'abstenir d'accroitre ses investissements ou sa participation dans Arbor, soit 
directement, soit par l'intermediaire de Congas ou de toute autre filiale, au-dela de la limite actuel- 
lement autorisee, c'est-a-dire de 21 millions de dollars en capitaux propres et 80 millions de dollars 
sous forme d'emprunts connexes contractus par Arbor. 

La Commission a approuve le financement subsidiaire propose pour Gazifere, sous reserve 
de certaines conditions. Elle a cependant fait remarquer que les emprunts contractus par des filiales 
non reglementees ne devaient jamais constituer plus qu'une faible part des investissements a long 
terme effectues par la compagnie. La decision prise au sujet de ces questions est en instance d'appel 
devant la Commission. 




' "*$ i<" •—■Tin mej- . j«h . . ".-'r~ vvjswa ^— 

Creusement d'une tranchee en vue de la pose du pipeline NPS 42 approuvee par la Commission 
(EBLO 230) 




Anna Maleszyk, avocate de 
la Commission, fournit une 
evaluation juridique. 



Cout du gaz EBRO 452-3 

Par le biais d'un protocole d'entente date du 12 octobre 1988 (et modifie le 12 decembre), Consumers 
et WGML ont etabli les conditions de nouveaux contrats regissant les ventes de gaz a des tarifs 
separes. Consumers a conclu par ailleurs un contrat distinct de transport de gaz avec TCPL. Dans 
un avis de motion en date du 19 octobre 1988, Consumers a demande a la Commission d'approuver, 
aux fins de tarification, le cout du gaz prevu par ce contrat pour la premiere et la seconde annees 
contractuelles auxquelles il se rapporte. L'entente devait entrer en vigueur le l er Janvier 1989, a 
condition que la Commission accorde son autorisation au plus tard le 20 avril 1989. En outre, elle 
a ete priee d'approuver les couts du gaz prevus par des contrats que la compagnie avait conclus 
pour faire face aux periodes de pointe hivernales et a d'autres besoins de longue duree. 

Comme on l'a explique precedemment dans la partie intitulee « Audiences relatives au cout 
du gaz », le contrat de vente conclu avec WGML repartit le gaz vendu en deux blocs dont le prix 
est fixe a l'avance pour les deux premieres annees. Dans le contrat passe avec Consumers, le 
bloc A consiste en 150 milliards de pieds cubes sur quinze ans, et le bloc B, en 38 milliards de pieds 
cubes sur cinq ans, avec possibility de renouvellement annuel par la suite. A compter du debut 
de la troisieme annee du contrat, les deux parties negocieront le prix du gaz pour les deux blocs. 
Au cas ou les clients de Consumers decideraient de s'approvisionner directement aupres des pro- 
ducteurs, le contrat permet une eventuelle reduction du volume des deux blocs. WGML et Consumers 
se sont egalement entendus pour partager toute surcapacite de transport que Consumers pourrait 
avoir sur le reseau de TCPL. 

L'audience a debute le 6 fevrier 1989 et s'est terminee le 13 mars par la presentation de la contre- 
argumentation de Consumers. Dans sa decision rendue le 14 avril 1989, la Commission a approuve, 
aux fins de tarification, le cout du gaz prevu pendant les deux premieres annees par le contrat conclu 
avec WGML et par d'autres contrats d'approvisionnement. 

ICG 

Examen par la Commission 

ICG n'a presente aucune demande de revision tarifaire a la Commission pour son exercice financier 
1989. L'agent charge de revaluation du rendement energetique de la Commission, apres avoir etudie 
les donnees financieres pertinentes, a recommande qu'ICG soit exemptee d'un examen public des 
tarifs. 

Cout du gaz EBRO 440-2 

Le 11 octobre 1988, ICG a conclu une entente avec TCPL et WGML pour la fourniture et le trans- 
port de gaz. Cette entente, en vigueur depuis le l er Janvier 1989, se compose d'un contrat de vente 
de gaz et d'une entente d'exploitation sur le transport, tous deux conclus avec WGML, ainsi que 
de contrats de transport passes avec TCPL pour les differentes zones de livraison du reseau ICG. 
L'entente d'ICG prevoyait des blocs de gaz d'une duree de quinze et de cinq ans; elle a remplace 
les contrats de service a debit souscrit conclus avec TCPL. L'entente precedente d'ICG relative a 
la fixation des prix etait arrivee a expiration le 31 octobre 1988. Du l er novembre au 31 decembre 
1988, conformement a l'entente de 1986 et a son amendement de 1987, ICG s'est approvisionnee 
aupres de WGML/TCPL, et les contrats portant sur les debits souscrits sont restes en vigueur durant 
cette periode. 

Dans sa decision du 14 avril 1989, la Commission a approuve, aux fins de tarification, le cout 
du gaz prevu par le contrat WGML pendant les deux premieres annees. 

Demande de reouverture du dossier relatif a la Phase II d'ICG, deposee par Falconbridge Limited 

EBRO 411-IIIA, 430-IIA 

Le 17 juin 1988, Falconbridge, client industriel d'ICG, a demande a la Commission d'eclaircir, de 
revoir ou de soumettre a une nouvelle audience sa decision du 20 mai 1988, qui portait sur des questions 
de repartition des couts et de structure tarifaire interessant ICG. Dans sa demande, Falconbridge 
exprimait le souhait que les ajustements retroactifs entrant en vigueur le 20 fevrier 1987 soient calcules 
en fonction d'une moyenne par categorie plutot que client par client, en vertu de la nouvelle structure 
basee sur des tarifs a souscription-a l'unite consommee, appliquee aux gros clients industriels d'ICG. 



ftk 



La Commission a rendu sa decision le 20 septembre 1988. Desormais consciente des graves 
consequences financieres imposees a certains clients par la nouvelle structure basee sur des tarifs 
a souscription-a l'unite consommee, et notamment aux clients a faible coefficient d'utilisation, la 
Commission a conclu que la date d'entree en vigueur de la nouvelle structure tarifaire d'ICG devait 
etre le l er Janvier 1988, et que les factures des clients en cause seraient retroactivement rajustees 
selon une moyenne par categorie pour la periode s'etendant du 20 fevrier au 31 decembre 1987. 

NRG 

Redressement tarifaire provisoire EBRO 451-1 

Dans une lettre datee du 19 octobre 1988, NRG a demande un redressement tarifaire provisoire 
afin de recouvrer un deficit accumule dans un compte de report etabli par la Commission pour 
determiner les ecarts entre le cout prevu du gaz et son cout reel. La Commission, dans sa decision 
provisoire du 22 mars 1989, a autorise NRG a inscrire 134 745 dollars au compte en date du 
30 septembre 1988. Elle a indique en outre que les interets afferents a ces couts devaient y etre 
inscrits eux aussi. Toutefois, elle a refuse d'accorder les mesures de redressement demandees, du 
fait que la compagnie n'avait pas presente suffisamment de preuves pour justifier le recouvrement 
de ces montants par voie tarifaire. Elle a demande a NRG d'avancer des elements de preuve supple- 
mentaires a l'appui de sa revendication lors de la prochaine audience d'examen de ses tarifs 
principaux. 

UNION 

Demande relative aux tarifs principaux EBRO 456 

Le 31 aout 1988, Union a demande a la Commission d'autoriser une majoration de ses tarifs pour 

l'exercice financier 1990 afin de compenser une insuffisance de recettes prevue de 32,065 millions 

de dollars. Par la suite, Union a ramene ce chiffre a 16,546 millions de dollars pour tenir compte 

des incidences de la reforme fiscale federale et de nouvelles previsions fondees sur les resultats du 

deuxieme trimestre de l'exercice 1989. L'insuffisance etait calculee en fonction d'un rendement de 

14,875 pour cent des actions ordinaires et d'un ratio de capitaux propres de 29 pour cent. 




Machines a souder automatiques utilisees lors de la construction du pipeline NPS 42 approuvee 
par la Commission (EBLO 230) 

La Commission, de sa propre initiative, a effectue un examen limite de l'exercice 1989 de Union 
pour etudier le niveau de rendement approprie des actions ordinaires, de la dette a court et a long 
terme et des actions privilegiees; la base de tarification; les recettes de stockage et de transport; 
les volumes de gaz non comptabilises; les previsions quant au volume total debite; et les couts 
de main-d'oeuvre. Cet examen a debute le 7 novembre 1988 et a pris fin neuf jours plus tard. 
Dans la decision quelle a rendue le 20 mars 1988, la Commission a etabli la base de tarification 
a 1,026 milliard de dollars, le taux de rendement autorise a 11,9 pour cent et l'excedent total des 




Katy Chu fournit des ser- 
vices de secretariat dans le 
cadre de la preparation d'une 
decision de la CEO. 



recettes a 24,687 millions de dollars. La Commission a enjoint a Union de rembourser 10,1 millions 
de dollars a ses abonnes, compte tenu des economies prevues suite a la reforme fiscale. Elle a egale- 
ment ordonne a la compagnie de reduire ses tarifs a compter du l er novembre 1988, ayant constate 
qu'avec les tarifs en vigueur, Union aurait realise des recettes excedentaires de 14,587 millions de 
dollars sur une base annuelle, sans compter les effets de la reforme fiscale. Ses conclusions etaient 
essentiellement fondees sur des rajustements des previsions du debit total emises par Union et sur 
un rendement des actions ordinaires de 13,75 pour cent. 

Du 4 au 20 Janvier 1989, la Commission a commence a entendre les preuves a l'appui de la 
majoration tarifaire demandee par Union pour 1990. Elle a decide de reporter jusqu'en avril 1989 
l'examen de la partie de la requete concernant la structure tarifaire et la repartition des couts, afin 
de se donner le temps d'etudier les ententes sur le cout du gaz renegociees entre Union et WGML. 
A la fin de son exercice financier, la Commission ne s'etait pas encore prononcee sur la demande 
deposee par Union pour que Ton considere 1990 comme un exercice de reference. 

Cout du gaz EBRO 456-4 

Le 31 aout 1988, Union Gas a demande a la Commission d'emettre une ordonnance fixant des tarifs 
justes et raisonnables pour la vente, le stockage et le transport du gaz, ainsi qu'une ordonnance 
imposant la prise en compte, dans les tarifs, des couts du gaz prevus par les ententes d'achat conclues 
avec TCPL et WGML pour la periode de livraison commencant le l er novembre 1988. Le 
25 novembre 1988, Union et WGML sont parvenues a une entente de principe sur de nouveaux 
arrangements visant l'approvisionnement a long terme, qui devait prendre effet le l er fevrier 1989, 
et elles ont conclu des arrangements provisoires sur la fixation des prix pour la periode allant du 
l er novembre 1988 au 31 Janvier 1989. En Janvier 1989, WGML et Union ont ratifie le nouveau 
contrat d'approvisionnement. 

En vertu de ces nouvelles ententes, les anciens contrats etaient divises en deux composantes 
separees, l'une portant sur l'approvisionnement et l'autre sur le transport. L'arrangement conclu 
entre Union et WGML pour la vente de gaz comprend deux blocs, soit un bloc A d'une duree de 
douze ans, et un bloc B d'une duree de trois ans. Le volume total de gaz a prendre dans le cadre 
de ce contrat en 1989 se chiffre a 104 milliards de pieds cubes. Le bloc B represente les volumes 
destines a ceux des abonnes d'Union qui ont conclu des arrangements RGD avec WGML. Cet arran- 
gement contient une clause permettant 1'annulation des contrats portant sur 10 pour cent des volumes 
de gaz carburant jusqu'au 31 octobre 1989, et prevoit, pour l'annee suivante, la possibility de sous- 
traire des volumes supplementaires a l'application des dispositions des contrats. 

Union, a la difference des autres distributeurs de l'Ontario, n'a pas signe de contrat de trans- 
port de longue duree avec TCPL. Dans le contrat d'approvisionnement figure une clause autorisant 
le partage de toute surcapacite qu'Union pourrait avoir sur le reseau de TCPL. L'audience s'est 
deroulee du 2 au 17 mars, et les plaidoyers finals ont ete entendus le 4 avril. 

Dans sa decision du 14 avril 1989, la Commission a approuve, aux fins de tarification, le cout 
du gaz prevu par le contrat WGML pendant les deux premieres annees, ainsi que par d'autres contrats 
d'approvisionnement . 



DEMANDES RELATIVES A DES INSTALLATIONS 

CONSUMERS 

Poste de livraison Rugby et pipeline de renforcement a la bale Georgienne 

EBLO 223; EBC 182, 183; EBA 492, 493 

La Commission, dans sa decision du 8 juin 1988, a approuve la demande presentee par Consumers I 
en vue de la construction d'un troncon de pipeline NPS 8 de 48 kilometres dans le comte de Simcoe 
pour renforcer son reseau d'approvisionnement desservant la region de Midland, qui fonctionnait 
a pleine capacite. La Commission a juge que le nouveau pipeline offrirait effectivement aux con- | 
sommateurs de la baie Georgienne un approvisionnement plus sur. Par la meme occasion, Consumers 
avait demande a la Commission d'emettre des certificats de commodite et de necessite publiques 
et d'approuver les accords de franchise municipale conclus avec le village de Coldwater et le canton 
de Medonte, etant donne que ces deux regions pouvaient egalement etre desservies par le nouveau 
pipeline. La Commission a approuve ces demandes. 



BW 




icholas Belak, agent charge 
' lexamen du rendement 
ergetique, etudie une fiche 
chnique deposee par des 
>mpagnies de services 
iblics. 



Pipeline de renforcement Peterborough-Lindsay EBLO 225 (PL 62); EBC 184, 185, 186; EBA 494, 495, 496 
Le 26 mai 1988, la Commission a entendu des demandes presentees par Consumers en vue de cons- 
truire un troncon de pipeline NPS 12 de 31 kilometres traversant les cantons de Hope et Cavan. 
Selon la compagnie, ce pipeline presenterait l'avantage de renforcer l'actuel reseau de Consumers 
dans la region de Peterborough, d'offrir a ce marche une seconde source d'approvisionnement et 
de desservir les abonnes etablis en bordure du trace. Consumers voulait egalement l'autorisation 
de fournir et de distribuer du gaz dans les cantons de Hope, Hamilton et South Monaghan, qui 
pourraient etre desservis a partir du pipeline projete. 

La Commission, dans sa decision du 22 juillet 1988, a approuve la construction du pipeline, 
jugeant qu'il etait necessaire pour garantir un approvisionnement sur et raisonnable dans les regions 
de Peterborough et de Lindsay. Quant aux demandes visant a desservir les cantons de Hope et 
de Hamilton, la Commission les a rejetees en faisant valoir qu'ICG fournissait deja un service adequat 
dans ces cantons en vertu de franchises et de certificats existants. 

ICG 

Horseshoe Valley EBLO 228; EBC 187, 139-B; EBA 503 

ICG a demande l'autorisation de construire des troncons de pipeline NPS 4 et NPS 2 d'environ 

8,5 kilometres pour desservir de nouveaux clients de la region de Horseshoe Valley, dans les cantons 

d'Oro et de Medonte. Consumers est intervenue a cette audience en demandant qu'on lui permette 

d'etudier les avantages de la construction d'un nouveau pipeline desservant la region de Horseshoe 

Valley. 

Dans sa decision du 20 octobre 1988, la Commission a mis son jugement en delibere, en atten- 
dant de recevoir des renseignements sur un pro jet de construction residentiel envisage dans la region. 
Elle a egalement encourage ICG et Consumers a songer a construire ensemble un branchement sur 
l'actuel reseau de Consumers. 

Prices Corners EBLO 229 

ICG a demande a la Commission l'autorisation de construire un troncon de pipeline NPS 4 de 
2,2 kilometres dans le comte de Simcoe en vue de desservir la collectivite de Prices Corners, situee 
dans les cantons d'Oro et de Medonte. Consumers, qui detient les droits de distribution du gaz 
naturel dans ces deux cantons, est intervenue pendant l'audience pour reiterer son intention de des- 
servir Prices Corners. La Commission, dans sa decision du 20 octobre 1988, a rejete la demande 
d'ICG. 

UNION 

Pipeline St Clair EBLO 226/226A 

Union a demande l'autorisation de construire un troncon de pipeline NPS 24 de 11,73 kilometres, 
allant du poste de vanne que Ton envisage d'installer a St Clair a la station de ligne industrielle 
projetee pour Sarnia, dans le canton de Moore, pour continuer ensuite jusqu'a la station de com- 
pression du reservoir de Bickford, dans le canton de Sombra. Les parties en cause ont presente 
leurs preuves du 16 au 20 juin 1988, et l'argumentation orale a ete entendue le 24 juin. Par la suite, 
TCPL a demande l'autorisation de presenter un complement de preuves qui, selon elle, se rappor- 
tait a la question de savoir si la Commission avait ou non competence pour rendre une decision 
au sujet d'un pipeline qui servirait directement a assurer les mouvements de gaz de part et d'autre 
d'une frontiere internationale. L'audience a done repris le 16 aout 1988. 

Dans sa decision du l er septembre 1988, la Commission a juge que les installations projetees 
seraient dans l'interet du public. Plus particulierement, elles amelioreraient l'acces aux reserves de 
gaz americaines, qui reposent sur une base plus large, et offriraient des solutions de rechange en 
matiere de transport; elles se traduiraient par un approvisionnement plus sur grace a la diversifica- 
tion des sources; elles completeraient les installations de stockage deja amenagees en Ontario en 
offrant acces aux zones de stockage du Michigan et en permettant l'integration des deux reseaux 
de stockage. Enfin, le gaz americain achete a des prix fermes ou au jour le jour etant plus facile 
a obtenir et a stocker, Union et les clients auxquels elle fournit des services de stockage et de trans- 
port disposeraient de nouveaux leviers de pression lorsque viendrait le moment de negocier le prix 
des volumes primaires de gaz en provenance de l'Ouest canadien. 



A 



La Commission a juge que le projet de pipeline relevait de sa competence et a rejete ainsi la 
motion presentee par TCPL a ce propos. Elle a donne a Union l'autorisation de construire les 
installations envisagees, sous reserve de certaines conditions. TCPL a interjete appel de la decision, 
arguant que seul l'Office national de l'energie est habilite a statuer sur ce type de question. La Cour 
divisionnaire a maintenu la decision de la CEO. 

Pipeline de stockage Dawn 156 EBLO 227 

Dans une lettre a la Commission datee du 6 juin 1988, M. Ken McGregor a porte plainte contre 
Union, qui construisait un pipeline NPS 30 traversant la propriete McGregor dans le canton de 
Dawn. Union a replique que le pipeline etait necessaire pour accroitre de 3,8 milliards de pieds 
cubes la capacite du reservoir sous-jacent a la propriete. La compagnie a soutenu qu'il s'agissait 
d'un pipeline de collecte, et non de transport, et qu'elle avait le droit de penetrer sur les terres en 
question, celles-ci etant situees dans la zone de stockage designee, sans l'autorisation prealable de 
la Commission. 

La Commission a emis une ordonnance de procedure, datee du 30 juin 1988, sommant Union 
d'interrompre sur le champ les travaux de construction et de comparaitre devant elle le 6 juillet. 
Une fois la situation etudiee, la Commission a rendu une decision provisoire dans laquelle elle a 
conclu que le pipeline etait une conduite de transport, et elle a avise tous les interesses qu'elle pren- 
drait connaissance des preuves se rapportant a cette question. Dans sa decision du 15 aout 1988, 
la Commission a juge que le pipeline etait necessaire pour repondre aux besoins de stockage d'Union 
et des clients auxquels elle fournissait des services de stockage. La Commission a revoque son ordon- 
nance de cessation des travaux et a accorde a Union l'exemption voulue pour construire le pipeline 
de transport. 

Union avait presente une demande d'appel de la decision de la Commission devant la Cour 
divisionnaire de l'Ontario en faisant valoir qu'elle etait autorisee a construire des pipelines dans 
une zone de stockage designee sans l'aval de la Commission. La Cour a rejete cette demande, confir- 
mant ainsi que la Commission avait competence en la matiere. Union a aussi ete deboutee d'une 
nouvelle demande d'appel contre la decision de la Cour. 

Programme d'agrandissement des installations de transport de Strathroy et de Beachville EBLO 230 
Le 20 octobre 1988, Union a propose la construction de deux troncons de pipeline NPS 42 pour 
doubler son reseau de transport de Dawn-Trafalgar, soit un troncon de 18 kilometres depuis le 
poste de livraison de Strathroy a la station de compression de Lobo, et un troncon de 20 kilometres 
allant de la station de transport de Beachville a la station de compression de Bright. Les nouveaux 
pipelines permettraient a Union de completer son programme de doublement entrepris entre la station 
de compression de Dawn et l'antenne de Kirkwall, et de faire face a la demande sans cesse plus 
grande de services de transport reclames par ses clients. 

Les installations proposees ont fait l'objet d'une audience le 6 decembre 1988 et ont recu l'auto- 
risation de la Commission le 14 fevrier 1988. 



DEMANDES RELATIVES AU STOCKAGE DE GAZ 

TECUMSEH 

Designation du reservoir de Dow-Moore EBO 147 

Le 26 Janvier 1988, Tecumseh a demande a la Commission de designer comme zone de stockage 
un gisement de gaz epuise dans le canton de Moore, connu sous le nom de reservoir Dow-Moore 
3-21-XII. La compagnie a egalement demande l'autorisation d'injecter et de stocker du gaz dans 
le reservoir de Dow-Moore, et d'en retirer. 

La Commission a constate que ce reservoir, propriete conjointe de Tecumseh et de Union, 
constitue le plus important recif a pinacles inexploite connu dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario qui 
soit apte a servir au stockage du gaz. Dans le rapport qu'elle a soumis le 2 mai 1989 au lieutenant- 
gouverneur en conseil, la Commission a recommande que les terrains surplombant le reservoir soient 
designes comme zone de stockage. Cela fait, elle a aussi autorise Tecumseh a injecter et stocker 
du gaz dans le reservoir et a en retirer, sous reserve de certaines conditions. 



k 



Pipeline du reservoir de Dow-Moore EBLO 224 

Dans une decision datee du 27 mai 1988, la Commission a approuve une demande presentee par 
Tecumseh en vue d'amenager le reservoir de stockage de Dow-Moore, ainsi qu'une demande annexe 
visant la construction d'un troncon de pipeline NPS 24 de 7 kilometres pour desservir le reservoir 
a partir de la station de compression de la compagnie. Le nouveau pipeline a ete concu et mis a 
l'epreuve en fonction des exigences auxquelles Consumers devrait faire face pour assurer le service 
a ses abonnes en periode de pointe, en liaison avec les autres reservoirs de Tecumseh. Le pipeline 
a aussi ete etudie pour resister a d'eventuelles hausses de pression dans le reservoir de Dow-Moore. 

Reservoir de stockage de gaz de Dow-Moore EBRM 89 

Le 5 juin 1988, la Commission a recu du ministre des Richesses naturelles sept demandes emanant 
de Tecumseh au sujet de permis de forage dans le reservoir de Dow-Moore. Dans son rapport du 
21 juillet au ministre, la Commission a approuve les demandes, sous reserve de certaines condi- 
tions. II n'y a pas eu d'audience publique, les demandes n'ayant fait l'objet d'aucune contestation. 

Tarifs de stockage prenant en compte les installations du reservoir de Dow-Moore EBRO 455-1 
Le 30 aout 1988, Tecumseh a presente a la Commission une demande de majoration de ses tarifs 
en vue de recouvrer les frais lies a l'exploitation des installations de stockage du reservoir de Dow- 
Moore. Une audience d'une journee s'est deroulee le 17 novembre 1988. Dans sa decision, datee 
du 5 decembre, la Commission a indique qu'un rajustement provisoire etait justifie, sans quoi l'exploi- 
tation du reservoir se serait soldee par un deficit prevu de 1,1 million de dollars. L'acquisition et 
l'amenagement de ces installations avaient augmente d'environ 50 pour cent le niveau des investis- 
sements nets de Tecumseh. 

Reservoir de stockage de Kimball-Colinville EBRM 90/92 

Le ministre des Richesses naturelles a saisi la Commission de quatre demandes presentees par 
Tecumseh pour la delivrance de permis de forage dans le reservoir de Kimball-Colinville, soit trois 
demandes le 6 juin et la quatrieme le 28 juillet 1988. La Commission a approuve les demandes, 
sous reserve de certaines conditions, sans proceder par voie d'audience, vu l'absence de contestation. 

UNION 

Reservoir de stockage Dawn 156 EBRM 91 

Le ministre des Richesses naturelles, dans une lettre datee du 5 juillet 1988, a transmis a la Commission 

deux demandes de Union Gas pour la delivrance de permis de forage dans le reservoir de stockage 

Dawn 156. La Commission a approuve les demandes, sous reserve de certaines conditions, sans 

proceder par voie d'audience, vu l'absence de contestation. 



A 



LEXIQUE DE TERMES ET INITIALES 

Base de tarification : Montant investi par une entreprise de services publics dans les biens utilises 
pour fournir les services, moins ramortissement cumule, plus le montant consacre au fonds de 
roulement et tout autre poste retenu par la Commission. La base de tarification peut egalement 
etre nette d'impots sur le revenu reportes et cumules. 

Bp3 : Abreviation designant un milliard de pieds cubes de gaz, soit lequivalent de 28,328 millions 
de metres cubes. 

Comite ontarien de coordination des pipelines (COCP) : Comite interministeriel preside par un 
membre du personnel de la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario et forme de representants des 
ministeres du gouvernement de l'Ontario qui se sont collectivement engages a reduire a un mini- 
mum les repercussions environnementales de la construction et de l'exploitation de pipelines. Le 
concept d'environnement, interprete au sens large, englobe l'agriculture, les pares, les forets, la 
faune, les ressources en eau, les ressources sociales et culturelles, la securite du public et les droits 
des proprietaries fonciers. 

Contrat d'achat et de vente : Contrat en vertu duquel un utilisateur final achete du gaz aupres 
d'un producteur pour le vendre ensuite a une compagnie locale de distribution qui melange ce gaz 
a des volumes provenant d'autres fournisseurs. L'utilisateur final achete ensuite du gaz aupres de 
la compagnie locale de la facon habituelle. La difference entre le prix paye au producteur et le prix 
recu par la compagnie locale, moins les frais de transport, revient a l'utilisateur final. 

Contrat de transport : Service fourni pour le transport de gaz n'appartenant pas a la compagnie 
de transport par pipeline; les tarifs de transport sous contrat sont parfois appeles tarifs T. 

Demande contractuelle : Quantite de gaz qu'une entreprise de services publics ou un abonne a 
le droit d'exiger quotidiennement, en vertu d'un contrat, de la part du fournisseur de gaz. 

ELD : Entreprise locale de distribution. 

Evitement : Non-utilisation du reseau de la compagnie locale de distribution pour le transport du 
gaz. 

Exercice de reference : Periode de douze mois consecutifs (en general, le prochain exercice finan- 
cier complet de l'entreprise) pour laquelle des previsions des revenus, des couts, des depenses et 
de la base de tarification sont soumises a l'examen de la Commission afin d'etablir les tarifs qui 
permettront a l'entreprise de services publics d'obtenir un rendement adequat. 

Frais lies a la demande : Frais mensuels qui couvrent generalement les frais fixes du reseau. Les 
frais lies a la demande sont bases sur le volume quotidien prevu au contrat et doivent etre acquittes 
quels que soient les volumes de gaz pris. 

Frais lies au produit : Frais percus pour chaque unite de volume de gaz effectivement prise par 
l'acheteur. lis different des frais lies a la demande, qui sont des frais constants calcules a partir 
du volume maximal qu'un acheteur a le droit de prendre, meme si aucune quantite de gaz n'est 
prise pendant la periode visee. 

Gaz distribue : Gaz distribue par les producteurs en vertu d'un contrat conclu avec TCPL. 

Gigajoule (GJ) : Unite de mesure du contenu energetique des combustibles et carburants. Un abonne 
residentiel typique utilise environ 130 gigajoules (GJ) par an pour chauffer sa residence (un GJ 
d'energie thermique est egal a environ 0,95 million de pieds cubes de gaz naturel). 

GWh : Gigawatt-heure. 

Intervention : Avis d'intention de participer a une audience, dans lequel les raisons pour lesquel- 
les on s'interesse aux deliberations sont indiquees. La personne ou le groupe qui en est l'auteur 
porte le nom d'intervenant. 






k 



NPS : Diametre nominal du tube (« nominal pipe size » en anglais). Par exemple, NPS 24 designe 
un tube dont le diametre exterieur approximatif mesure 610 mm, ou 24 pouces. 

Ordonnance de la Commission : Document juridique regissant la mise a execution dune decision 
de la Commission. Les parties concernees doivent se conformer aux dispositions qu'il contient. 

Plaidoirie : Etape finale de l'audience au cours de laquelle les participants resument leur position 
face aux diverses questions soulevees d'apres les preuves presentees. 

Questionnaires : Demande ecrite de presentation de renseignements supplementaires ou d'expli- 
cations sur certains renseignements deja recus. 

Recommandations de la Commission : Generalement contenues dans un rapport de la Commis- 
sion presente a un ministre ou au lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil et portant sur Ontario Hydro 
ou une autre question liee au domaine energetique. Les parties concernees ne sont pas obligees de 
se conformer a ces recommandations, sauf dans les circonstances enoncees a l'article 23 de la Loi 
sur la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario. 

Rendement des actions ordinaires : Revenu apres impot de l'entreprise de services publics, exprime 
en pourcentage du montant des actions ordinaires, qu'elle est autorisee a inclure dans la structure 
de son capital. 

Revenus exiges : Revenus que l'entreprise de services publics doit realiser par l'entremise des tarifs 
pour amortir les couts de service. Ces revenus correspondent au montant des depenses permises 
de l'entreprise, additionnees du rendement permis sur la base de tarification. 

RGD : Revente de gaz distribue. Entente en vertu de laquelle un consommateur achete du gaz 
a WMGL, a la frontiere de l'Alberta, a un prix negocie. Le gaz est immediatement revendu a 
WMGL/TCPL, a la frontiere de l'Alberta, au prix en vigueur entre l'ELD et WMGL/TCPL. L'ELD 
achete alors le gaz a WMGL/TCPL, toujours a la frontiere de l'Alberta, et l'assimile a son reseau; 
l'abonne reste done le client de l'ELD. 

Tarif degroupe : Tarif impose pour une partie du service offert par un distributeur, par opposi- 
tion au tarif comprenant le cout de diverses composantes d'un service. 

Tarifs de vente d'electricite en gros : Tarifs de vente d'electricite en gros imposes par Ontario Hydro 
aux municipality et a certains clients industriels qui consomment en moyenne 5 000 kilowatts et 
plus par annee. 

Taux de rendement sur la base de tarification : Revenus apres impot exprimes en pourcentage de 
la base de tarification que l'entreprise de services publics est autorisee a gagner. Ce rendement n'est 
pas garanti mais correspond au rendement auquel l'entreprise peut raisonnablement s'attendre compte 
tenu des conditions prevues. 

TCPL : TransCanada Pipelines Limited. 

Ventes directes : Ventes de gaz naturel negociees entre le producteur et l'utilisateur final, a des 
prix n'englobant pas le transport. Le transport par pipeline doit faire l'objet d'ententes distinctes 
a negocier avec TCPL et l'entreprise locale de distribution. 

Volume total debite : Total des volumes de gaz vendus, achetes directement et transported, auquel 
s'ajoutent, s'il y a lieu, les volumes stockes. 

WMGL : Western Marketing Group Limited. 

Zone designee de stockage de gaz : Zone emergee comportant des formations geologiques, dans 
lesquelles une personne peut, sous reserve de l'autorisation de la Commission, injecter et stocker 
du gaz, pour pouvoir ensuite Ten retirer. En vertu de l'article 20 de la Loi sur la Commission de 
l'energie de l'Ontario, il est interdit d'injecter du gaz dans une formation geologique ne faisant pas 
partie d'une zone de stockage designee. 



A 



JUN 3 1992